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Duck Sauce - Radio Stereo
Rating: 8/10
Tracklisting:
1. Radio Stereo
2. Radio Stereo (Bingo Players Remix)
Released: November 5th (Fools Gold Records)
The quack is back! And I mean properly this time, if like me you thought that It’s You was a bit hit and miss. This EP is a huge return to form for A-Trak and Armand Van Helden, capturing everything that made their first hit, aNYway, such a big hit. The disco sample is firmly set in place, with added basslines and a strong drumline, adding to the effect. These might seem like minor additions but after hearing the version of Radio Stereo that’s been floating around the internet for 2 years, it really improves matters. If i’m ever introducing someone to Duck Sauce from now on, i’m definitely kicking things off with Radio Stereo. Expect this to be a staple on any dance aficionado’s music library from here on.
Rounding things off is Bingo Players remix. To be honest with you, I wasn’t expecting great things, having sadly lumped them into the vague “EDM” category in my head along with Swedish House Mafia and Tiesto. But i’ve been proven wrong before and this proves that wonderfully. Yes the drum beat is 4/4, but give it a chance, rather than dropping into the regular song but with added bassdrums, they instead add what sounds like a voicebox melody, ripped straight from Fragments Of Time, off Daft Punk’s latest effort. Admittedly, after this it does feel a tad more generic, but it feels like a faithful remix, and worth listening to for sure.
Also check out:
Daft Punk - Random Access Memories
Chromeo - Business Casual
Oliver - Mechanical

Duck Sauce - Radio Stereo

Rating: 8/10

Tracklisting:

1. Radio Stereo

2. Radio Stereo (Bingo Players Remix)

Released: November 5th (Fools Gold Records)

The quack is back! And I mean properly this time, if like me you thought that It’s You was a bit hit and miss. This EP is a huge return to form for A-Trak and Armand Van Helden, capturing everything that made their first hit, aNYway, such a big hit. The disco sample is firmly set in place, with added basslines and a strong drumline, adding to the effect. These might seem like minor additions but after hearing the version of Radio Stereo that’s been floating around the internet for 2 years, it really improves matters. If i’m ever introducing someone to Duck Sauce from now on, i’m definitely kicking things off with Radio Stereo. Expect this to be a staple on any dance aficionado’s music library from here on.

Rounding things off is Bingo Players remix. To be honest with you, I wasn’t expecting great things, having sadly lumped them into the vague “EDM” category in my head along with Swedish House Mafia and Tiesto. But i’ve been proven wrong before and this proves that wonderfully. Yes the drum beat is 4/4, but give it a chance, rather than dropping into the regular song but with added bassdrums, they instead add what sounds like a voicebox melody, ripped straight from Fragments Of Time, off Daft Punk’s latest effort. Admittedly, after this it does feel a tad more generic, but it feels like a faithful remix, and worth listening to for sure.

Also check out:

Daft Punk - Random Access Memories

Chromeo - Business Casual

Oliver - Mechanical

Thor: The Dark World
Released: October 30th 2013
Rating: 8/10
Starring: Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman, Tom Hiddleston, Christopher Eccleston & Anthony Hopkins

(DISCLAIMER: I’ve decided i’m going to try and expand past just music, so i’ll start with this seeing as I saw it yesterday!)
I’m acutely aware that I think this after every movie ever, but this was the best movie i’ve ever seen in my life, move over Empire Strikes Back, hit the road Godfather, i’ve seen the epitome of filmmaking, and it’s a 200 pound Australian wielding a hammer with more force than a British person who’s just seen the words “bake sale”
Admittedly that’s not true, but this looks set to be one of my favourite Marvel films yet, and I’m not really sure why. It has all the hallmarks of a Marvel adaptation, spectacular special effects, on point casting, and of course, the customary Stan Lee cameo. So what makes this particular outing stand out from the rest? It’s all excellently balanced this time around. The last Marvel adaptation was Iron Man 3 (cue uncomfortable groans from the readers), where it wasn’t so much as a superhero movie as some sort of twisted buddy cop movie, except the “buddy” for a large majority of the movie was simply Tony Stark, so it felt jarring at best. But in Thor, the jokes feel well placed, acting as they’re supposed to, rather than trying to cram so many that in places it feels like a parody of an actual superhero movie (you all know what scene I mean). My personal highlight of the movie is a scene that pairs up Thor with Loki, leaving the exchange between the two proving these two are the funniest pairing that Marvel has created.
Thor 2 starts with a monologue from Odin, explaining the structure of the universe and how before light there was darkness, and how Christopher Eccleston and his merry band of dark elves wish to conquer the universe by returning the universe into darkness. Don’t be put off by the copy and pasted storyline, it works pretty well. This leads Thor to return to Earth through inexplicable means (again) and rescue his ladyfriend Jane Foster, who just happens to have stumbled into an alternative universe for a few hours and picked up the ultimate evil necessary to destroy the universe as we know it. Oh and then he just buggers off back to Asgard with her, which just causes all kinds of shit, unsurprisingly. Unfortunately, a lot of big talking points for the plot are spoilers, but expect lots of action up in Asgard, with Eccleston taking the fight to the Asgardians, with a band of followers who, despite looking like an interpretive dance troupe, had the good sense to bring guns to a knife fight. There’s some great scenes with Hemsworth and Hopkins getting to expand their strained father/son relationship, though no games of catch on the Bifrost just yet, as well as Thor’s cadre of elite nameless characters, still comprised of Wonder Woman, Lord Flashheart from Blackadder, Genghis Khan and a man who wandered in from the set of The Hobbit all get to commit treason to prove their loyalty to Thor. As clichéd as it is, the scenes are genuinely quite lovely.
Sadly, the biggest problem with the movie are the Dark Elves, who feel much like the Chitauri from The Avengers, acting simply as Mjolnir-fodder for most of the movie, there is no background to them whatsoever. There is no reason given for their plans of domination of the universe, leaving it to our imaginations that they’re doing it because they’re evil. Their faceless presence throughout the movie doesn’t give any sense of dread or evil, simply being there.
Despite these flaws, the movie still manages to stand up to its predecessor. The tone is different this time around, being different from the fish-out-of-water comedy that was the original, this time being a more dramatic, action packed outing, but it’s great viewing nonetheless.
Also, a fun little cameo from Chris O’Dowd in the beginning of the film as Jane’s awkward date makes wonderful viewing.
In Short: At least it’s not Iron Man 3

Thor: The Dark World

Released: October 30th 2013

Rating: 8/10

Starring: Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman, Tom Hiddleston, Christopher Eccleston & Anthony Hopkins

(DISCLAIMER: I’ve decided i’m going to try and expand past just music, so i’ll start with this seeing as I saw it yesterday!)

I’m acutely aware that I think this after every movie ever, but this was the best movie i’ve ever seen in my life, move over Empire Strikes Back, hit the road Godfather, i’ve seen the epitome of filmmaking, and it’s a 200 pound Australian wielding a hammer with more force than a British person who’s just seen the words “bake sale”

Admittedly that’s not true, but this looks set to be one of my favourite Marvel films yet, and I’m not really sure why. It has all the hallmarks of a Marvel adaptation, spectacular special effects, on point casting, and of course, the customary Stan Lee cameo. So what makes this particular outing stand out from the rest? It’s all excellently balanced this time around. The last Marvel adaptation was Iron Man 3 (cue uncomfortable groans from the readers), where it wasn’t so much as a superhero movie as some sort of twisted buddy cop movie, except the “buddy” for a large majority of the movie was simply Tony Stark, so it felt jarring at best. But in Thor, the jokes feel well placed, acting as they’re supposed to, rather than trying to cram so many that in places it feels like a parody of an actual superhero movie (you all know what scene I mean). My personal highlight of the movie is a scene that pairs up Thor with Loki, leaving the exchange between the two proving these two are the funniest pairing that Marvel has created.

Thor 2 starts with a monologue from Odin, explaining the structure of the universe and how before light there was darkness, and how Christopher Eccleston and his merry band of dark elves wish to conquer the universe by returning the universe into darkness. Don’t be put off by the copy and pasted storyline, it works pretty well. This leads Thor to return to Earth through inexplicable means (again) and rescue his ladyfriend Jane Foster, who just happens to have stumbled into an alternative universe for a few hours and picked up the ultimate evil necessary to destroy the universe as we know it. Oh and then he just buggers off back to Asgard with her, which just causes all kinds of shit, unsurprisingly. Unfortunately, a lot of big talking points for the plot are spoilers, but expect lots of action up in Asgard, with Eccleston taking the fight to the Asgardians, with a band of followers who, despite looking like an interpretive dance troupe, had the good sense to bring guns to a knife fight. There’s some great scenes with Hemsworth and Hopkins getting to expand their strained father/son relationship, though no games of catch on the Bifrost just yet, as well as Thor’s cadre of elite nameless characters, still comprised of Wonder Woman, Lord Flashheart from Blackadder, Genghis Khan and a man who wandered in from the set of The Hobbit all get to commit treason to prove their loyalty to Thor. As clichéd as it is, the scenes are genuinely quite lovely.

Sadly, the biggest problem with the movie are the Dark Elves, who feel much like the Chitauri from The Avengers, acting simply as Mjolnir-fodder for most of the movie, there is no background to them whatsoever. There is no reason given for their plans of domination of the universe, leaving it to our imaginations that they’re doing it because they’re evil. Their faceless presence throughout the movie doesn’t give any sense of dread or evil, simply being there.

Despite these flaws, the movie still manages to stand up to its predecessor. The tone is different this time around, being different from the fish-out-of-water comedy that was the original, this time being a more dramatic, action packed outing, but it’s great viewing nonetheless.

Also, a fun little cameo from Chris O’Dowd in the beginning of the film as Jane’s awkward date makes wonderful viewing.

In Short: At least it’s not Iron Man 3

Kanye West - Yeezus
Rating: 9/10
Tracklisting:
1. On Sight (Feat. Daft Punk)
2. Black Skinhead (Feat. Daft Punk)
3. I Am A God (Feat. God)
4. New Slaves (Feat. Frank Ocean)
5. Hold My Liquor (Feat. Justin Vernon & Chief Keef)
6. I'm In It (Feat. Assassin & Justin Vernon)
7. Blood On The Leaves
8. Guilt Trip (Feat. Kid Cudi)
9. Send It Up (Feat. King L & Gesaffelstein)
10. Bound 2 (Feat. Charlie Wilson)
Released: June 18 2013 (Roc-A-Fella Records, Def Jam Records)
Kanye West has always been a man who wasn’t comfortable releasing “easy” albums, always creating something that challenged the listener, that defied the conventions of music at the time, bringing a breath of fresh air for rap and hip-hop each time. However, for Yeezus, his sixth studio album, collaborations and compilations notwithstanding, it doesn’t take the form of a breath of fresh air as much as it forcibly grabs the listener’s ears and shoves them down a wind tunnel. Once again, he has redefined his sound, this time opting for an all-out, abrasive, angry sound, influenced by everything from Chicago acid house, to industrial rock, to more recent avant-garde hip hop, popularised by acts such as Death Grips or Tyler The Creator. Yeezus also features some downright surprising collaborators and producers, ranging from techno’s man of the moment Gesaffelstein, to up & coming Chicago rapper King L, to demigods of electronic music Daft Punk. The result is an album that feels almost unlistenable in places upon the first listen, but given the chance, this presents itself as some of West’s strongest work to date.
The album kicks off with the distorted 303 acid roller On Sight. The track, provided by Parisian kings of electro Daft Punk, sets the stage for the whole album, clocking in at under 3 minutes, it’s short, but definitely not sweet. However, it manages to be just a strong as the rest of the album, despite being somewhat jarring, especially when an inexplicable choir sample interrupts halfway through. If this was any other artist, I would have thought that my CD was broken, but this is a Kanye West album, and I’ve learned to expect the unexpected, and that it’s all there for a reason. Listening back, the choir is revealed to be singing ”He’ll give us what we need, It may not be what we want”. Is West saying that he knows that his latest effort with disappoint some, but they need to hear it regardless? It certainly seems possible, and it wouldn’t be surprising, given how he pulled a similar trick with his 4th album, 808s & Heartbreak.
The second track on the album Black Skinhead is a loud, punk/rap hybrid, described as “super primal and raw and super violent” by Daft Punk, who recorded much of the instruments with West in their Paris studio, alongside their recording of their latest album Random Access Memories. Black Skinhead is the polar opposite of RAM, featuring heavy drum breaks, and deep, dark synths, serving as the album’s most radio friendly track, which isn’t saying much at all. Even the title is a poke at white supremacists, who are often described as “skinheads”, and how West is often painted as a racist, whereas he always asserts that the black population in America, along with the other minorities, are beginning to stand up for their rights. The lyrics speak of the media’s distortion of reality and racism, with West referencing Hitler “trapped in a theatre”. Anyone with even a vague notion of world history will be aware that Hitler died in his bunker beneath Berlin, but in the Quentin Tarantino movie “Inglourious Basterds”, Hitler is trapped and killed in a theatre. West also makes a reference to “black kids in Chiraq”, a slang term used among Chicago’s youth in referral to the city’s high murder rate, illuminating that this fails to garner any attention from America’s principal news outlets. Like the rest of the album, this album is millions of miles away from the old-school soul samples of The College Dropout or the stadium rock influenced Graduation, feeling bombastic and energetic, but in a completely new way.
Blood On The Leaves is definitely one of the more familiar songs on the album, taking the vulnerability and auto-tune of 808s & Heartbreak, and combines it with the grandiose and intricate production of his latest work on My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, as well as Cruel Summer, the compilation album from West’s G.O.O.D Music cadre. The track opens by sampling “Strange Fruit” by Nina Simone. Readers may be wondering about West has managed to flip a song about American racism, into a song about unwanted children, and how they are used as a means to an end, or are even just viewed as a burden on the parents, but in this context, the sample feels appropriate. Gone are the days when West’s samples are simply facsimiles of the song they’re used in, such as Never Let Me Down, or Stronger. Now they have become separate voices, adding another layer of depth to the song, where the children, who are ignored in terms of narrative, which is left to the arguing parents, are given a voice, being represented through the “black bodies” described by Simone. West also samples “R U Ready”, a seminal trap track from TNGHT, a collaboration project between Canadian producer Lunice and Scottish DJ Hudson Mohawke, the latter of whom also produces I am a God. The concept of “Strange Fruit” mixing with a trap track is initially baffling, but after listening, it’s difficult to imagine this floorfiller any other way.
The album closes with the track Bound 2, a track that stutters along, sounding that a throwback, to West’s soulful origins on The College Dropout, constructed mostly from a chopped sample of “Bound” by Ponderosa Twins Plus One, whilst Charlie Wilson drops a hook over an interpolation of Aeroplane (Reprise) by Wee. Whilst this song carries on the tradition of West using soul samples in his music, this is clearly a song from Yeezus, with West’s rapping being harsher and more vulgar than his critically acclaimed debut. Lyrically, the song speaks of West’s status in society, referring to his position as music’s prime troublemaker, as well as making references to college and college life, a hark back to his first 3 albums, which all followed the theme of education. The last lines on the album read “Jerome’s in the house, watch your mouth!”, a joke about Martin Lawrence’s 1990’s TV character, a parody of “ghetto black people”, this could be a hint that West is aware of his behaviour and lyrical content on Yeezus, perhaps stating that Yeezus is in fact a persona, not only his “God name”, as West told friends and fans as his NYC listening party.
If West’s last solo effort was grand and opulent, an elegant party with fine wine and caviar, then Yeezus is a warehouse rave at 3am with copious amounts of illegal substances. The smooth samples and intricate melodies have all been replaced with an eclectic collection of harsh instruments and a cacophony of acid house, industrial rock and hip hop, leaving behind a brash, unforgiving but ultimately rewarding hybrid that feels perfectly natural for West.

Also check out:
The Bloody Beetroots - Hide
Pusha T - My Name Is My Name
Death Grips - No Love Deep Webb

Kanye West - Yeezus

Rating: 9/10

Tracklisting:

1. On Sight (Feat. Daft Punk)

2. Black Skinhead (Feat. Daft Punk)

3. I Am A God (Feat. God)

4. New Slaves (Feat. Frank Ocean)

5. Hold My Liquor (Feat. Justin Vernon & Chief Keef)

6. I'm In It (Feat. Assassin & Justin Vernon)

7. Blood On The Leaves

8. Guilt Trip (Feat. Kid Cudi)

9. Send It Up (Feat. King L & Gesaffelstein)

10. Bound 2 (Feat. Charlie Wilson)

Released: June 18 2013 (Roc-A-Fella Records, Def Jam Records)

Kanye West has always been a man who wasn’t comfortable releasing “easy” albums, always creating something that challenged the listener, that defied the conventions of music at the time, bringing a breath of fresh air for rap and hip-hop each time. However, for Yeezus, his sixth studio album, collaborations and compilations notwithstanding, it doesn’t take the form of a breath of fresh air as much as it forcibly grabs the listener’s ears and shoves them down a wind tunnel. Once again, he has redefined his sound, this time opting for an all-out, abrasive, angry sound, influenced by everything from Chicago acid house, to industrial rock, to more recent avant-garde hip hop, popularised by acts such as Death Grips or Tyler The Creator. Yeezus also features some downright surprising collaborators and producers, ranging from techno’s man of the moment Gesaffelstein, to up & coming Chicago rapper King L, to demigods of electronic music Daft Punk. The result is an album that feels almost unlistenable in places upon the first listen, but given the chance, this presents itself as some of West’s strongest work to date.

The album kicks off with the distorted 303 acid roller On Sight. The track, provided by Parisian kings of electro Daft Punk, sets the stage for the whole album, clocking in at under 3 minutes, it’s short, but definitely not sweet. However, it manages to be just a strong as the rest of the album, despite being somewhat jarring, especially when an inexplicable choir sample interrupts halfway through. If this was any other artist, I would have thought that my CD was broken, but this is a Kanye West album, and I’ve learned to expect the unexpected, and that it’s all there for a reason. Listening back, the choir is revealed to be singing He’ll give us what we need, It may not be what we want”. Is West saying that he knows that his latest effort with disappoint some, but they need to hear it regardless? It certainly seems possible, and it wouldn’t be surprising, given how he pulled a similar trick with his 4th album, 808s & Heartbreak.

The second track on the album Black Skinhead is a loud, punk/rap hybrid, described as “super primal and raw and super violent” by Daft Punk, who recorded much of the instruments with West in their Paris studio, alongside their recording of their latest album Random Access Memories. Black Skinhead is the polar opposite of RAM, featuring heavy drum breaks, and deep, dark synths, serving as the album’s most radio friendly track, which isn’t saying much at all. Even the title is a poke at white supremacists, who are often described as “skinheads”, and how West is often painted as a racist, whereas he always asserts that the black population in America, along with the other minorities, are beginning to stand up for their rights. The lyrics speak of the media’s distortion of reality and racism, with West referencing Hitler “trapped in a theatre”. Anyone with even a vague notion of world history will be aware that Hitler died in his bunker beneath Berlin, but in the Quentin Tarantino movie “Inglourious Basterds”, Hitler is trapped and killed in a theatre. West also makes a reference to “black kids in Chiraq”, a slang term used among Chicago’s youth in referral to the city’s high murder rate, illuminating that this fails to garner any attention from America’s principal news outlets. Like the rest of the album, this album is millions of miles away from the old-school soul samples of The College Dropout or the stadium rock influenced Graduation, feeling bombastic and energetic, but in a completely new way.

Blood On The Leaves is definitely one of the more familiar songs on the album, taking the vulnerability and auto-tune of 808s & Heartbreak, and combines it with the grandiose and intricate production of his latest work on My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, as well as Cruel Summer, the compilation album from West’s G.O.O.D Music cadre. The track opens by sampling “Strange Fruit” by Nina Simone. Readers may be wondering about West has managed to flip a song about American racism, into a song about unwanted children, and how they are used as a means to an end, or are even just viewed as a burden on the parents, but in this context, the sample feels appropriate. Gone are the days when West’s samples are simply facsimiles of the song they’re used in, such as Never Let Me Down, or Stronger. Now they have become separate voices, adding another layer of depth to the song, where the children, who are ignored in terms of narrative, which is left to the arguing parents, are given a voice, being represented through the “black bodies” described by Simone. West also samples “R U Ready”, a seminal trap track from TNGHT, a collaboration project between Canadian producer Lunice and Scottish DJ Hudson Mohawke, the latter of whom also produces I am a God. The concept of “Strange Fruit” mixing with a trap track is initially baffling, but after listening, it’s difficult to imagine this floorfiller any other way.

The album closes with the track Bound 2, a track that stutters along, sounding that a throwback, to West’s soulful origins on The College Dropout, constructed mostly from a chopped sample of “Bound” by Ponderosa Twins Plus One, whilst Charlie Wilson drops a hook over an interpolation of Aeroplane (Reprise) by Wee. Whilst this song carries on the tradition of West using soul samples in his music, this is clearly a song from Yeezus, with West’s rapping being harsher and more vulgar than his critically acclaimed debut. Lyrically, the song speaks of West’s status in society, referring to his position as music’s prime troublemaker, as well as making references to college and college life, a hark back to his first 3 albums, which all followed the theme of education. The last lines on the album read “Jerome’s in the house, watch your mouth!”, a joke about Martin Lawrence’s 1990’s TV character, a parody of “ghetto black people”, this could be a hint that West is aware of his behaviour and lyrical content on Yeezus, perhaps stating that Yeezus is in fact a persona, not only his “God name”, as West told friends and fans as his NYC listening party.

If West’s last solo effort was grand and opulent, an elegant party with fine wine and caviar, then Yeezus is a warehouse rave at 3am with copious amounts of illegal substances. The smooth samples and intricate melodies have all been replaced with an eclectic collection of harsh instruments and a cacophony of acid house, industrial rock and hip hop, leaving behind a brash, unforgiving but ultimately rewarding hybrid that feels perfectly natural for West.

Also check out:

The Bloody Beetroots - Hide

Pusha T - My Name Is My Name

Death Grips - No Love Deep Webb

The Bloody Beetroots - Hide
Rating: 9/10
Tracklisting:
1. Spank (Feat. Tai & Bart B More)
2. Raw (Feat. Tommy Lee)
3. Runaway (Feat. Greta Svabo Bech)
4. Chronicles Of A Fallen Love (Feat. Greta Svabo Bech)
5. The Furious (Feat. Penny Rimbaud)
6. Out Of Sight (Feat. Paul McCartney & Youth)
7. Albion With Junior
8. Reactivated
9. All The Girls (Around The World) (Feat. Theophilus London)
10. Please Baby (Feat. P-Thugg)
11. Glow In The Dark (Feat. Sam Sparro)
12. The Source (Chaos & Confusion)
13. The Beat (Feat. Peter Frampton)
14. Rocksteady (The Bloody Beetroots Vs. Gigi Barocco)
15. Volevo Un Gatto Nero (You Promised Me) (Feat. Gigi Barocco)
Released:16 September 2013 (Ultra Records)
I’m sure many of you are familiar with Daft Punk's latest album, Random Access Memories, where the Parisian electro pioneers turned back the clock and released an album full of summer anthems, laden with the guitar work of Nile Rodgers and Paul Jackson Jr. (whose work can be found all over Micheal Jackson’s Thriller). This new LP from “Sir Bob Cornelius Rifo”, serves as the anti-thesis to RAM, which chooses to manhandle your eardrums and shove them down a wind-tunnel instead of serenade them with smooth disco grooves.
The album kicks off with Spank, a collaboration with Tai & Bart B More, which was released in February 2013. Out of all of the tracks that make up the new album, this one sounds closest to Rifo’s first album Romborama. It is loud, obnoxious electro at its best, the typical Dim Mak sound, but it throws a curveball towards the latter half of the song, with a short piano interlude, followed by a string accompaniment, building back up to the chorus, displaying Rifo’s training as a classical musician, and really giving the track some depth, distancing it from the branding of “EDM”.
The second track on the album is Raw, featuring the talents of Mötley Crüe founder and drummer Tommy Lee. This track really shows off Rifo’s heavier influences, which didn’t really shine through on Romborama, but showed up on Rifoki, Bob’s hardcore punk project with Dim Mak head honcho Steve Aoki. The track certainly lives up to it’s namesake, overflowing with crash symbols, distorted guitars and unusual time signatures. The track even takes time to gently tease the re-emergence of disco, featuring a dramatic change in style, where the track segues into a disco breakdown, featuring Tommy exclaiming “Woah Bob what the fuck is this? fucking disco music? you can’t be serious this is fucking bullshit, what’s next Bob? some cheesy little fucking leap synth?” and of course, Rifo obliges with just that. If this had been on any other album this sort of change of pace would have felt out of place and clunky, but on this album, it feels right at home.
Out of Sight, the album’s 6th track is definitely the biggest surprise, featuring Paul McCartney, as well as Paul’s fellow Fireman Martin Glover, using his Youth persona. Those more familiar with McCartney having written Hey Jude, might be wondering what the hell he’s doing working with Rifo, but this track dispels any confusion, these two working together is as good as Kanye West & Justin Vernon, or Kid Cudi & Crookers. 
My personal favourite from the album is, unfortunately, also one of the shortest. Clocking in at only 2 minutes and 53 seconds, is Please Baby, a collaboration with Patrick “P-Thugg" Gamayel, of Chromeo fame. This track is, in the simplest terms possible, like a hyped up Chromeo track, it shows off Patrick’s typical talkbox madness and synth-playing, but rather than accompanying Dave1’s smooth vocals, it’s at the forefront of the music, backed up by Bob’s shuddering electro.
Rocksteady is another suprising track on the album, because it’s not Rocksteady. “What the fuck is he talking about?” I hear you ask. Well this version of Rocksteady, is not the song that was released back in 2012, but is in fact a re-edited version of the Gigi Barocco remix, who shows up on the album’s closing track, a ear-shattering trash metal / electro hybrid that destroys any idea that this album wasn’t incredible. Presumably, Bob thought that Gigi's remix was even better than the original, and turned it into the final album edit, the extended opening and altered drop make this re-edit one of the strongest tracks on the album.
The album’s closing track, a proper collaboration with Gigi Barocco, Volevo Un Gatto Nero (You Promised Me), is quite frankly, insanity. Starting off with a children’s choir, the song suddenly becomes something not unlike what would happen if Kill Em All-era Metallica decided that they really needed Skrillex to spice up their new album. And i’ll fight anyone who says that this song doesn’t impress them, because Bob has certainly saved the best until last.
The rest of the album features appearances from, electro’s first lady, Greta Svabo Bech, as well as man of the moment Theophilus London, and talkbox pioneer Peter Frampton, who all bring their own flair to the album, but ultimately, this album works best if listened to as a whole, much like Justice's †or The Prodigy's Fat Of The Land.
This is definitely one of my album’s of the year, a huge recommendation, if you hadn’t guessed that already.
Stream:
Rolling Stone
Also check out:
Kanye West - Yeezus (just the whole album, it’s as eclectic as this one)
Justice - Waters Of Nazareth
Rage Against The Machine - Rage Against The Machine

The Bloody Beetroots - Hide

Rating: 9/10

Tracklisting:

1. Spank (Feat. Tai & Bart B More)

2. Raw (Feat. Tommy Lee)

3. Runaway (Feat. Greta Svabo Bech)

4. Chronicles Of A Fallen Love (Feat. Greta Svabo Bech)

5. The Furious (Feat. Penny Rimbaud)

6. Out Of Sight (Feat. Paul McCartney & Youth)

7. Albion With Junior

8. Reactivated

9. All The Girls (Around The World) (Feat. Theophilus London)

10. Please Baby (Feat. P-Thugg)

11. Glow In The Dark (Feat. Sam Sparro)

12. The Source (Chaos & Confusion)

13. The Beat (Feat. Peter Frampton)

14. Rocksteady (The Bloody Beetroots Vs. Gigi Barocco)

15. Volevo Un Gatto Nero (You Promised Me) (Feat. Gigi Barocco)

Released:16 September 2013 (Ultra Records)

I’m sure many of you are familiar with Daft Punk's latest album, Random Access Memories, where the Parisian electro pioneers turned back the clock and released an album full of summer anthems, laden with the guitar work of Nile Rodgers and Paul Jackson Jr. (whose work can be found all over Micheal Jackson’s Thriller). This new LP from “Sir Bob Cornelius Rifo”, serves as the anti-thesis to RAM, which chooses to manhandle your eardrums and shove them down a wind-tunnel instead of serenade them with smooth disco grooves.

The album kicks off with Spank, a collaboration with Tai & Bart B More, which was released in February 2013. Out of all of the tracks that make up the new album, this one sounds closest to Rifo’s first album Romborama. It is loud, obnoxious electro at its best, the typical Dim Mak sound, but it throws a curveball towards the latter half of the song, with a short piano interlude, followed by a string accompaniment, building back up to the chorus, displaying Rifo’s training as a classical musician, and really giving the track some depth, distancing it from the branding of “EDM”.

The second track on the album is Raw, featuring the talents of Mötley Crüe founder and drummer Tommy Lee. This track really shows off Rifo’s heavier influences, which didn’t really shine through on Romborama, but showed up on Rifoki, Bob’s hardcore punk project with Dim Mak head honcho Steve Aoki. The track certainly lives up to it’s namesake, overflowing with crash symbols, distorted guitars and unusual time signatures. The track even takes time to gently tease the re-emergence of disco, featuring a dramatic change in style, where the track segues into a disco breakdown, featuring Tommy exclaiming “Woah Bob what the fuck is this? fucking disco music? you can’t be serious this is fucking bullshit, what’s next Bob? some cheesy little fucking leap synth?” and of course, Rifo obliges with just that. If this had been on any other album this sort of change of pace would have felt out of place and clunky, but on this album, it feels right at home.

Out of Sight, the album’s 6th track is definitely the biggest surprise, featuring Paul McCartney, as well as Paul’s fellow Fireman Martin Glover, using his Youth persona. Those more familiar with McCartney having written Hey Jude, might be wondering what the hell he’s doing working with Rifo, but this track dispels any confusion, these two working together is as good as Kanye West & Justin Vernon, or Kid Cudi & Crookers

My personal favourite from the album is, unfortunately, also one of the shortest. Clocking in at only 2 minutes and 53 seconds, is Please Baby, a collaboration with Patrick “P-Thugg" Gamayel, of Chromeo fame. This track is, in the simplest terms possible, like a hyped up Chromeo track, it shows off Patrick’s typical talkbox madness and synth-playing, but rather than accompanying Dave1’s smooth vocals, it’s at the forefront of the music, backed up by Bob’s shuddering electro.

Rocksteady is another suprising track on the album, because it’s not Rocksteady. “What the fuck is he talking about?” I hear you ask. Well this version of Rocksteady, is not the song that was released back in 2012, but is in fact a re-edited version of the Gigi Barocco remix, who shows up on the album’s closing track, a ear-shattering trash metal / electro hybrid that destroys any idea that this album wasn’t incredible. Presumably, Bob thought that Gigi's remix was even better than the original, and turned it into the final album edit, the extended opening and altered drop make this re-edit one of the strongest tracks on the album.

The album’s closing track, a proper collaboration with Gigi BaroccoVolevo Un Gatto Nero (You Promised Me), is quite frankly, insanity. Starting off with a children’s choir, the song suddenly becomes something not unlike what would happen if Kill Em All-era Metallica decided that they really needed Skrillex to spice up their new album. And i’ll fight anyone who says that this song doesn’t impress them, because Bob has certainly saved the best until last.

The rest of the album features appearances from, electro’s first lady, Greta Svabo Bech, as well as man of the moment Theophilus London, and talkbox pioneer Peter Frampton, who all bring their own flair to the album, but ultimately, this album works best if listened to as a whole, much like Justice's or The Prodigy's Fat Of The Land.

This is definitely one of my album’s of the year, a huge recommendation, if you hadn’t guessed that already.

Stream:

Rolling Stone

Also check out:

Kanye West - Yeezus (just the whole album, it’s as eclectic as this one)

Justice - Waters Of Nazareth

Rage Against The Machine - Rage Against The Machine

All Hazards - California Soul
Rating: 4/5
Tracklisting:
1. California Soul
2. Party Down
3. Blame It All On You
4. Blur
5. Summer Fog
Released: 14 October 2011 (Independently released)

I love this EP.
Clever disco samples but with synths that both Dillon Francis & Justice would be proud, this EP carries on the great work started off by Daft Punk with the release of Discovery (and is probably going to be continued with the upcoming new album.
The EP kicks off with title track California Soul, which sounds like All Hazards' answer to Crescendolls, even using the same breakdown technique just past the halfway mark. Based around a vocal loop, this song is a perfect summer anthem and feels like a breath of fresh air after listening to the likes of Skrillex & Crookers.
More disco sampling on the next track, Party Down. This song sounds like it was ripped straight from a Duck Sauce EP, which is by no means a bad thing. This song is very simple, with most of the song coming from the disco samples, however there is some more of the Dillon Francis style synths at work here.
Track number 3, Blame It All On You, is quite a slow burner, starting out sounding like a precursor to Madeon's Finale. But after a while that 2007 era Justice synth gets to work, and it kills the track. Suddenly the slow walking beat track gets a high energy work out and becomes something much better.
Blur is the 4th track on the album, following the precedent set by the previous song. A walking beat track, but here the synths take greater priority, with a chaotic drop transforming it into a disco/electro/club banger
The EP ends with Summer Fog, where for the first time, the song doesn’t begin with a sample, instead beginning with a simple synth melody, which is layered with some catchy piano chords, this continues until the drop. At this point, the Justice synths make their triumphant return to make their mark on this track. Coupled with some Bon Jovi guitar cuts, this song shows that the American duo can make songs that don’t revolve around samples. The second drop on this track is a highlight, where everything is jacked up to 11, kicking the synths and guitars into overdrive, perfect for a hectic club environment. A perfect way to round of an EP.
(Though not strictly part of the EP, something also worth checking out on All Hazards’ soundcloud are their collection of remixes. From Daft Punk to the Smashing Pumpkins, every genre is covered and they’re as good, if not better than, this EP. The signature synths return in many places and all are worth a listen but particularly their remixes of Boys Noize, Phoenix, La Roux & Fake Blood.)
Download:
Soundcloud
Also check out:
Oliver - MYB
Duck Sauce - Grand Steppin’
Daft Punk - Crescendolls
Remixes:
Summer Fog (Signs’ Torture Edit)

All Hazards - California Soul

Rating: 4/5

Tracklisting:

1. California Soul

2. Party Down

3. Blame It All On You

4. Blur

5. Summer Fog

Released: 14 October 2011 (Independently released)

I love this EP.

Clever disco samples but with synths that both Dillon Francis & Justice would be proud, this EP carries on the great work started off by Daft Punk with the release of Discovery (and is probably going to be continued with the upcoming new album.

The EP kicks off with title track California Soul, which sounds like All Hazards' answer to Crescendolls, even using the same breakdown technique just past the halfway mark. Based around a vocal loop, this song is a perfect summer anthem and feels like a breath of fresh air after listening to the likes of Skrillex & Crookers.

More disco sampling on the next track, Party Down. This song sounds like it was ripped straight from a Duck Sauce EP, which is by no means a bad thing. This song is very simple, with most of the song coming from the disco samples, however there is some more of the Dillon Francis style synths at work here.

Track number 3, Blame It All On You, is quite a slow burner, starting out sounding like a precursor to Madeon's Finale. But after a while that 2007 era Justice synth gets to work, and it kills the track. Suddenly the slow walking beat track gets a high energy work out and becomes something much better.

Blur is the 4th track on the album, following the precedent set by the previous song. A walking beat track, but here the synths take greater priority, with a chaotic drop transforming it into a disco/electro/club banger

The EP ends with Summer Fog, where for the first time, the song doesn’t begin with a sample, instead beginning with a simple synth melody, which is layered with some catchy piano chords, this continues until the drop. At this point, the Justice synths make their triumphant return to make their mark on this track. Coupled with some Bon Jovi guitar cuts, this song shows that the American duo can make songs that don’t revolve around samples. The second drop on this track is a highlight, where everything is jacked up to 11, kicking the synths and guitars into overdrive, perfect for a hectic club environment. A perfect way to round of an EP.

(Though not strictly part of the EP, something also worth checking out on All Hazards’ soundcloud are their collection of remixes. From Daft Punk to the Smashing Pumpkins, every genre is covered and they’re as good, if not better than, this EP. The signature synths return in many places and all are worth a listen but particularly their remixes of Boys Noize, Phoenix, La Roux & Fake Blood.)

Download:

Soundcloud

Also check out:

Oliver - MYB

Duck Sauce - Grand Steppin’

Daft Punk - Crescendolls

Remixes:

Summer Fog (Signs’ Torture Edit)

Major Lazer - Lazer Strikes Back Vol. 1
Rating: 3/5
Tracklist:
1. Jah No Partial (Jack Beats Remix)
2. Get Free (Yellow Claw Get Free Money Remix)
3. Original Don (DGRC Remix)
4. Hot Chip - Look At Where We Are (Major Lazer Remix)
Released: February 22 2013 (Mad Decent)
Released by Major Lazer to tide over impatient fans after having the “Free The Universe” release date pushed back, this ep contains 3 remixes of existing Major Lazer tracks as well as a remix of Hot Chip's Look At Where We Are Now. Another 2 EPs like this are expected to follow in the run-up to Free The Universe's release
The first remix from the EP is Jah No Partial, remixed by Scottish/British production crew Jack Beats. This is a really simple electro-house edit of the original, electing to simply alter the BPM and fine tune the track to fit into a house DJ’s set. Nonetheless i’ve been looking for this sort of remix of Jah No Partial since I heard it so this remix is a godsend.
The next remix, from Yellow Claw, is quite eclectic, at times sounding like a drum and bass track, sounding like a trap remix the next, then ending off sounding like a twisted hardstyle track. This isn’t my favourite remix of Get Free i’ve heard but it’s by no means the worst one either
Original Don is up next, with a pretty calm remix by DGRC. This remix is far too calm to feel at home in a club, but it can be properly appreciated at home or on an iPod. It emphasises the original track’s vocal loop, but that’s mostly the only thing that remains of the original, with the rest being lost in order to create this remix.
The final track on the EP is a remix of Hot Chip's Look At Where We Are Now. Different from the original but not too different, this remix treads the line well and manages to come out with a good trap style remix.  Definitely a highlight of the EP if you're enjoying this new genre (and not just the Harlem Shake)
Download the EP for free here
Also check out:
Major Lazer - Guns Don’t Kill People…Lazers Do

Major Lazer - Lazer Strikes Back Vol. 1

Rating: 3/5

Tracklist:

1. Jah No Partial (Jack Beats Remix)

2. Get Free (Yellow Claw Get Free Money Remix)

3. Original Don (DGRC Remix)

4. Hot Chip - Look At Where We Are (Major Lazer Remix)

Released: February 22 2013 (Mad Decent)

Released by Major Lazer to tide over impatient fans after having the “Free The Universe” release date pushed back, this ep contains 3 remixes of existing Major Lazer tracks as well as a remix of Hot Chip's Look At Where We Are Now. Another 2 EPs like this are expected to follow in the run-up to Free The Universe's release

The first remix from the EP is Jah No Partial, remixed by Scottish/British production crew Jack Beats. This is a really simple electro-house edit of the original, electing to simply alter the BPM and fine tune the track to fit into a house DJ’s set. Nonetheless i’ve been looking for this sort of remix of Jah No Partial since I heard it so this remix is a godsend.

The next remix, from Yellow Claw, is quite eclectic, at times sounding like a drum and bass track, sounding like a trap remix the next, then ending off sounding like a twisted hardstyle track. This isn’t my favourite remix of Get Free i’ve heard but it’s by no means the worst one either

Original Don is up next, with a pretty calm remix by DGRC. This remix is far too calm to feel at home in a club, but it can be properly appreciated at home or on an iPod. It emphasises the original track’s vocal loop, but that’s mostly the only thing that remains of the original, with the rest being lost in order to create this remix.

The final track on the EP is a remix of Hot Chip's Look At Where We Are Now. Different from the original but not too different, this remix treads the line well and manages to come out with a good trap style remix.  Definitely a highlight of the EP if you're enjoying this new genre (and not just the Harlem Shake)

Download the EP for free here

Also check out:

Major Lazer - Guns Don’t Kill People…Lazers Do

Dog Blood - Next Order/Middle Finger
Rating: 4/5
Tracklisting:
1. Next Order
2. Middle Finger
Released: 12 August 2012 (Boys Noize Records/OWSLA)
As always i’m late with this, but seeing as I started this blog today I think that’s allowed.
Boys Noize & Skrillex. You wouldn’t be blamed for thinking that they wouldn’t be that interested in working with each other. But you thought wrong.
And it’s a very good thing that you were wrong. Because this is VERY good stuff.
The first track, Next Order, is exactly what you’d hope for from Ridha & Moore. It sounds like Boys Noize, but dancier, which is where Skrillex comes in. The melody is unmistakably Boys Noize, but Skrillex’s influence has instantly been felt, feeling more upbeat as a result. Skrillex’s signature vocal editing is in full effect here, combining with that synth to create a techno-infused club banger that all kinds of electro fans can love.
The other track, Middle Finger, is in a similar vein to the first, with the vocal editing back again, but this time it’s warping a loop of 2Pac to create a great build up, dropping into a funky beat where you can hear Skrillex’s synths in all their glory. A good alternative to Next Order and leaves you wanting more material, which is apparently coming soon.
Purchase:
Beatport
Also check out:
Boys Noize - Let’s Buy Happiness
Gesaffelstein - Depravity
Destructo - Technology 
Remixes:
Middle Finger (The M Machine Remix)

Dog Blood - Next Order/Middle Finger

Rating: 4/5

Tracklisting:

1. Next Order

2. Middle Finger

Released: 12 August 2012 (Boys Noize Records/OWSLA)

As always i’m late with this, but seeing as I started this blog today I think that’s allowed.

Boys Noize & Skrillex. You wouldn’t be blamed for thinking that they wouldn’t be that interested in working with each other. But you thought wrong.

And it’s a very good thing that you were wrong. Because this is VERY good stuff.

The first track, Next Order, is exactly what you’d hope for from Ridha & Moore. It sounds like Boys Noize, but dancier, which is where Skrillex comes in. The melody is unmistakably Boys Noize, but Skrillex’s influence has instantly been felt, feeling more upbeat as a result. Skrillex’s signature vocal editing is in full effect here, combining with that synth to create a techno-infused club banger that all kinds of electro fans can love.

The other track, Middle Finger, is in a similar vein to the first, with the vocal editing back again, but this time it’s warping a loop of 2Pac to create a great build up, dropping into a funky beat where you can hear Skrillex’s synths in all their glory. A good alternative to Next Order and leaves you wanting more material, which is apparently coming soon.

Purchase:

Beatport

Also check out:

Boys Noize - Let’s Buy Happiness

Gesaffelstein - Depravity

Destructo - Technology 

Remixes:

Middle Finger (The M Machine Remix)

Digitalism & Tommy Trash - Falling
Rating: 4/5
Released: 23 July 2012 (Spinnin’ Records)
There is no point reviewing this song really, but I really really like it and I feel that everyone should hear it.
The idea of a Digitalism/Tommy Trash collaboration is a very very odd one, and yet, surprisingly, it works.And even better, it works well. You can hear the individual styles of both Digitalism & Tommy Trash at work on this track, but they never clash, only serving to compliment one another.
The highlight of this track has to be the breakdown in the middle, where the song goes from loud, technical club powerhouse to happy carefree summer anthem, before building up back into it’s original melody.
It’s a great track, and one that should be appearing many DJ sets, come summertime
Also check out:
Steve Aoki - Ladi Dadi (Tommy Trash Remix)
Digitalism - Blitz

Digitalism & Tommy Trash - Falling

Rating: 4/5

Released: 23 July 2012 (Spinnin’ Records)

There is no point reviewing this song really, but I really really like it and I feel that everyone should hear it.

The idea of a Digitalism/Tommy Trash collaboration is a very very odd one, and yet, surprisingly, it works.
And even better, it works well. You can hear the individual styles of both Digitalism & Tommy Trash at work on this track, but they never clash, only serving to compliment one another.

The highlight of this track has to be the breakdown in the middle, where the song goes from loud, technical club powerhouse to happy carefree summer anthem, before building up back into it’s original melody.

It’s a great track, and one that should be appearing many DJ sets, come summertime

Also check out:

Steve Aoki - Ladi Dadi (Tommy Trash Remix)

Digitalism - Blitz

Bastille - Pompeii Remixes EP
Rating: 4/5
Tracklist:
1. Pompeii
2. Poet
3. Pompeii (Tyde Remix)
4. Pompeii (Monsieur Adi Remix)
5. Pompeii (Kat Krazy Remix)
Released: 22 February 2013 (Virgin Records)
Yes it’s finally here (i’m a little late with this but what are you going to do I made this blog 2 hours ago), and i’m very impressed with this EP.
Pompeii, Bastille’s newest hit, is currently engaged with Justin Timberlake in a struggle for chart supremacy, and it’s not hard to see why. Vocalist Dan Smith’s singing is pitch perfect in this track, and the mix between the synths (sounding not unlike those from Micheal Calfan’s Resurrection) and the drums sounding like they’ve been ripped straight from Kanye West’s Love Lockdown. The supporting vocals (provided by To Kill A King) give this track a very dramatic, and yet upbeat feel, guaranteeing the song’s commmerical success.
Poet, a previously unreleased track, is the other original track on this EP, the rest of the EP being made up of various Pompeii remixes. Another display of Bastille’s careful use of synths to accentuate their mostly acoustic instruments, this song feels like it would be at home in an indie movie as the backing to some sort of summer montage. An excellent addition to your music library.
The first of the Pompeii remixes comes from Tyde, a simple 135BPM remix of no particular merit (in my opinion). It fails to capture the feel of the original track like the other two tracks so it just fails to impress me very much.
The next remix comes from Monsieur Adi. Thisremix is a simple electro house edit but the synths used on this make it feel like more of an alternative take on Pompeii, if Bastille had decided to make a house infused track. Very good remix.
The final Pompeii remix comes from Kat Krazy, who has made a remix similar to that of Monsieur Adi, but a little more electro, giving this remix a sound that is reminiscent of Feed Me & Crystal Fighters’ Love Is All We Got.
This EP is an excellent offering from Bastille, showing the flexibility of their music and that it can even be turned from alternative indie to loud electro club bangers. Great value for money.
Purchase:
iTunes
Also check out:
Feed Me & Crystal Fighters - Love Is All We Got
Calvin Harris & Florence Welch - Sweet Nothing

Bastille - Pompeii Remixes EP

Rating: 4/5

Tracklist:

1. Pompeii

2. Poet

3. Pompeii (Tyde Remix)

4. Pompeii (Monsieur Adi Remix)

5. Pompeii (Kat Krazy Remix)

Released: 22 February 2013 (Virgin Records)

Yes it’s finally here (i’m a little late with this but what are you going to do I made this blog 2 hours ago), and i’m very impressed with this EP.

Pompeii, Bastille’s newest hit, is currently engaged with Justin Timberlake in a struggle for chart supremacy, and it’s not hard to see why. Vocalist Dan Smith’s singing is pitch perfect in this track, and the mix between the synths (sounding not unlike those from Micheal Calfan’s Resurrection) and the drums sounding like they’ve been ripped straight from Kanye West’s Love Lockdown. The supporting vocals (provided by To Kill A King) give this track a very dramatic, and yet upbeat feel, guaranteeing the song’s commmerical success.

Poet, a previously unreleased track, is the other original track on this EP, the rest of the EP being made up of various Pompeii remixes. Another display of Bastille’s careful use of synths to accentuate their mostly acoustic instruments, this song feels like it would be at home in an indie movie as the backing to some sort of summer montage. An excellent addition to your music library.

The first of the Pompeii remixes comes from Tyde, a simple 135BPM remix of no particular merit (in my opinion). It fails to capture the feel of the original track like the other two tracks so it just fails to impress me very much.

The next remix comes from Monsieur Adi. Thisremix is a simple electro house edit but the synths used on this make it feel like more of an alternative take on Pompeii, if Bastille had decided to make a house infused track. Very good remix.

The final Pompeii remix comes from Kat Krazy, who has made a remix similar to that of Monsieur Adi, but a little more electro, giving this remix a sound that is reminiscent of Feed Me & Crystal Fighters’ Love Is All We Got.

This EP is an excellent offering from Bastille, showing the flexibility of their music and that it can even be turned from alternative indie to loud electro club bangers. Great value for money.

Purchase:

iTunes

Also check out:

Feed Me & Crystal Fighters - Love Is All We Got

Calvin Harris & Florence Welch - Sweet Nothing

Strip Steve - Delta Disco
Rating: 4/5
Tracklist:
1. Breakin’
2. AM/FM
3. Dancin’
4. Children
5. Point Break
Released: 22 November 2009 (Boys Noize Records)

Yes i’m aware that this was released about 3 years ago, but a lot of people aren’t aware of who Strip Steve is, and that simply won’t do
The EP kicks off with my personal favourite, Breakin’.The entire EP sounds like a lovechild between Boys Noize and some 90’s house music, and that sounds is really prevalent in this track, right down to the cut up disco-esque melody and the looped vocals, to the Robot Rock style breakdown at the midway mark. This is a skillfully composed track that should take pride of place in any DJ’s setlist
Next up is AM/FM, a nice progressive house track, and not quite as chaotic as Breakin’. This song revolves around the bassline, which is augmented with various other layers as the track goes on, peaking in a relaxed funky disco track. Also that bassline near the end is to die for.
The EP’s third track, Dancin’, is a classic house banger. Based on a 2 second long vocal sample from a 1981 funk track, this track makes excellent of those drum beats that you only get with house music.But of course, just releasing a 90s house track might be a bit boring, so Steve brings in some of his funk synths to beef up the track a little bit, resulting in a brilliant track sure to get any club “jumping” (ugh I hate saying that), unless it’s populated by kids who listen to Swedish House Mafia
Disco is the main theme on Children, looping the phrase “feels good” at the beginning, just in case you weren’t sure on how to feel before now, and building up into another disco-house track. It’s a good thing that Steve does these styles well or I might have gotten writing the words “disco house” a few songs ago. But yeah, a funky track that feels like it could have been ripped straight from 1997.
The EP ends with Point Break, a departure from the fast paced house of the first 4 tracks, instead going for a relaxed (of sorts) track. Not my favourite track on the EP, a little too boring. Sorry Steve.
Aside from the somewhat weak ending, this EP is an excellent purchase and well worth the money (or torrenting, whatever you do)
Purchase Links:
Beatport / iTunes
Also check out:
Strip Steve - Delta Disco Remixes EP
Boston Bun - Housecall EP
Riton - Lost My Mind
Remixes:
Breakin’ (Rynecologist Remix)
Dancin’ (Ian Pooley Remix)

Strip Steve - Delta Disco

Rating: 4/5

Tracklist:

1. Breakin’

2. AM/FM

3. Dancin’

4. Children

5. Point Break

Released: 22 November 2009 (Boys Noize Records)

Yes i’m aware that this was released about 3 years ago, but a lot of people aren’t aware of who Strip Steve is, and that simply won’t do

The EP kicks off with my personal favourite, Breakin’.
The entire EP sounds like a lovechild between Boys Noize and some 90’s house music, and that sounds is really prevalent in this track, right down to the cut up disco-esque melody and the looped vocals, to the Robot Rock style breakdown at the midway mark. This is a skillfully composed track that should take pride of place in any DJ’s setlist

Next up is AM/FM, a nice progressive house track, and not quite as chaotic as Breakin’. This song revolves around the bassline, which is augmented with various other layers as the track goes on, peaking in a relaxed funky disco track. Also that bassline near the end is to die for.

The EP’s third track, Dancin’, is a classic house banger. Based on a 2 second long vocal sample from a 1981 funk track, this track makes excellent of those drum beats that you only get with house music.
But of course, just releasing a 90s house track might be a bit boring, so Steve brings in some of his funk synths to beef up the track a little bit, resulting in a brilliant track sure to get any club “jumping” (ugh I hate saying that), unless it’s populated by kids who listen to Swedish House Mafia

Disco is the main theme on Children, looping the phrase “feels good” at the beginning, just in case you weren’t sure on how to feel before now, and building up into another disco-house track. It’s a good thing that Steve does these styles well or I might have gotten writing the words “disco house” a few songs ago. But yeah, a funky track that feels like it could have been ripped straight from 1997.

The EP ends with Point Break, a departure from the fast paced house of the first 4 tracks, instead going for a relaxed (of sorts) track. Not my favourite track on the EP, a little too boring. Sorry Steve.

Aside from the somewhat weak ending, this EP is an excellent purchase and well worth the money (or torrenting, whatever you do)

Purchase Links:

Beatport / iTunes

Also check out:

Strip Steve - Delta Disco Remixes EP

Boston Bun - Housecall EP

Riton - Lost My Mind

Remixes:

Breakin’ (Rynecologist Remix)

Dancin’ (Ian Pooley Remix)

Duck Sauce - Radio Stereo
Rating: 8/10
Tracklisting:
1. Radio Stereo
2. Radio Stereo (Bingo Players Remix)
Released: November 5th (Fools Gold Records)
The quack is back! And I mean properly this time, if like me you thought that It’s You was a bit hit and miss. This EP is a huge return to form for A-Trak and Armand Van Helden, capturing everything that made their first hit, aNYway, such a big hit. The disco sample is firmly set in place, with added basslines and a strong drumline, adding to the effect. These might seem like minor additions but after hearing the version of Radio Stereo that’s been floating around the internet for 2 years, it really improves matters. If i’m ever introducing someone to Duck Sauce from now on, i’m definitely kicking things off with Radio Stereo. Expect this to be a staple on any dance aficionado’s music library from here on.
Rounding things off is Bingo Players remix. To be honest with you, I wasn’t expecting great things, having sadly lumped them into the vague “EDM” category in my head along with Swedish House Mafia and Tiesto. But i’ve been proven wrong before and this proves that wonderfully. Yes the drum beat is 4/4, but give it a chance, rather than dropping into the regular song but with added bassdrums, they instead add what sounds like a voicebox melody, ripped straight from Fragments Of Time, off Daft Punk’s latest effort. Admittedly, after this it does feel a tad more generic, but it feels like a faithful remix, and worth listening to for sure.
Also check out:
Daft Punk - Random Access Memories
Chromeo - Business Casual
Oliver - Mechanical

Duck Sauce - Radio Stereo

Rating: 8/10

Tracklisting:

1. Radio Stereo

2. Radio Stereo (Bingo Players Remix)

Released: November 5th (Fools Gold Records)

The quack is back! And I mean properly this time, if like me you thought that It’s You was a bit hit and miss. This EP is a huge return to form for A-Trak and Armand Van Helden, capturing everything that made their first hit, aNYway, such a big hit. The disco sample is firmly set in place, with added basslines and a strong drumline, adding to the effect. These might seem like minor additions but after hearing the version of Radio Stereo that’s been floating around the internet for 2 years, it really improves matters. If i’m ever introducing someone to Duck Sauce from now on, i’m definitely kicking things off with Radio Stereo. Expect this to be a staple on any dance aficionado’s music library from here on.

Rounding things off is Bingo Players remix. To be honest with you, I wasn’t expecting great things, having sadly lumped them into the vague “EDM” category in my head along with Swedish House Mafia and Tiesto. But i’ve been proven wrong before and this proves that wonderfully. Yes the drum beat is 4/4, but give it a chance, rather than dropping into the regular song but with added bassdrums, they instead add what sounds like a voicebox melody, ripped straight from Fragments Of Time, off Daft Punk’s latest effort. Admittedly, after this it does feel a tad more generic, but it feels like a faithful remix, and worth listening to for sure.

Also check out:

Daft Punk - Random Access Memories

Chromeo - Business Casual

Oliver - Mechanical

Thor: The Dark World
Released: October 30th 2013
Rating: 8/10
Starring: Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman, Tom Hiddleston, Christopher Eccleston & Anthony Hopkins

(DISCLAIMER: I’ve decided i’m going to try and expand past just music, so i’ll start with this seeing as I saw it yesterday!)
I’m acutely aware that I think this after every movie ever, but this was the best movie i’ve ever seen in my life, move over Empire Strikes Back, hit the road Godfather, i’ve seen the epitome of filmmaking, and it’s a 200 pound Australian wielding a hammer with more force than a British person who’s just seen the words “bake sale”
Admittedly that’s not true, but this looks set to be one of my favourite Marvel films yet, and I’m not really sure why. It has all the hallmarks of a Marvel adaptation, spectacular special effects, on point casting, and of course, the customary Stan Lee cameo. So what makes this particular outing stand out from the rest? It’s all excellently balanced this time around. The last Marvel adaptation was Iron Man 3 (cue uncomfortable groans from the readers), where it wasn’t so much as a superhero movie as some sort of twisted buddy cop movie, except the “buddy” for a large majority of the movie was simply Tony Stark, so it felt jarring at best. But in Thor, the jokes feel well placed, acting as they’re supposed to, rather than trying to cram so many that in places it feels like a parody of an actual superhero movie (you all know what scene I mean). My personal highlight of the movie is a scene that pairs up Thor with Loki, leaving the exchange between the two proving these two are the funniest pairing that Marvel has created.
Thor 2 starts with a monologue from Odin, explaining the structure of the universe and how before light there was darkness, and how Christopher Eccleston and his merry band of dark elves wish to conquer the universe by returning the universe into darkness. Don’t be put off by the copy and pasted storyline, it works pretty well. This leads Thor to return to Earth through inexplicable means (again) and rescue his ladyfriend Jane Foster, who just happens to have stumbled into an alternative universe for a few hours and picked up the ultimate evil necessary to destroy the universe as we know it. Oh and then he just buggers off back to Asgard with her, which just causes all kinds of shit, unsurprisingly. Unfortunately, a lot of big talking points for the plot are spoilers, but expect lots of action up in Asgard, with Eccleston taking the fight to the Asgardians, with a band of followers who, despite looking like an interpretive dance troupe, had the good sense to bring guns to a knife fight. There’s some great scenes with Hemsworth and Hopkins getting to expand their strained father/son relationship, though no games of catch on the Bifrost just yet, as well as Thor’s cadre of elite nameless characters, still comprised of Wonder Woman, Lord Flashheart from Blackadder, Genghis Khan and a man who wandered in from the set of The Hobbit all get to commit treason to prove their loyalty to Thor. As clichéd as it is, the scenes are genuinely quite lovely.
Sadly, the biggest problem with the movie are the Dark Elves, who feel much like the Chitauri from The Avengers, acting simply as Mjolnir-fodder for most of the movie, there is no background to them whatsoever. There is no reason given for their plans of domination of the universe, leaving it to our imaginations that they’re doing it because they’re evil. Their faceless presence throughout the movie doesn’t give any sense of dread or evil, simply being there.
Despite these flaws, the movie still manages to stand up to its predecessor. The tone is different this time around, being different from the fish-out-of-water comedy that was the original, this time being a more dramatic, action packed outing, but it’s great viewing nonetheless.
Also, a fun little cameo from Chris O’Dowd in the beginning of the film as Jane’s awkward date makes wonderful viewing.
In Short: At least it’s not Iron Man 3

Thor: The Dark World

Released: October 30th 2013

Rating: 8/10

Starring: Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman, Tom Hiddleston, Christopher Eccleston & Anthony Hopkins

(DISCLAIMER: I’ve decided i’m going to try and expand past just music, so i’ll start with this seeing as I saw it yesterday!)

I’m acutely aware that I think this after every movie ever, but this was the best movie i’ve ever seen in my life, move over Empire Strikes Back, hit the road Godfather, i’ve seen the epitome of filmmaking, and it’s a 200 pound Australian wielding a hammer with more force than a British person who’s just seen the words “bake sale”

Admittedly that’s not true, but this looks set to be one of my favourite Marvel films yet, and I’m not really sure why. It has all the hallmarks of a Marvel adaptation, spectacular special effects, on point casting, and of course, the customary Stan Lee cameo. So what makes this particular outing stand out from the rest? It’s all excellently balanced this time around. The last Marvel adaptation was Iron Man 3 (cue uncomfortable groans from the readers), where it wasn’t so much as a superhero movie as some sort of twisted buddy cop movie, except the “buddy” for a large majority of the movie was simply Tony Stark, so it felt jarring at best. But in Thor, the jokes feel well placed, acting as they’re supposed to, rather than trying to cram so many that in places it feels like a parody of an actual superhero movie (you all know what scene I mean). My personal highlight of the movie is a scene that pairs up Thor with Loki, leaving the exchange between the two proving these two are the funniest pairing that Marvel has created.

Thor 2 starts with a monologue from Odin, explaining the structure of the universe and how before light there was darkness, and how Christopher Eccleston and his merry band of dark elves wish to conquer the universe by returning the universe into darkness. Don’t be put off by the copy and pasted storyline, it works pretty well. This leads Thor to return to Earth through inexplicable means (again) and rescue his ladyfriend Jane Foster, who just happens to have stumbled into an alternative universe for a few hours and picked up the ultimate evil necessary to destroy the universe as we know it. Oh and then he just buggers off back to Asgard with her, which just causes all kinds of shit, unsurprisingly. Unfortunately, a lot of big talking points for the plot are spoilers, but expect lots of action up in Asgard, with Eccleston taking the fight to the Asgardians, with a band of followers who, despite looking like an interpretive dance troupe, had the good sense to bring guns to a knife fight. There’s some great scenes with Hemsworth and Hopkins getting to expand their strained father/son relationship, though no games of catch on the Bifrost just yet, as well as Thor’s cadre of elite nameless characters, still comprised of Wonder Woman, Lord Flashheart from Blackadder, Genghis Khan and a man who wandered in from the set of The Hobbit all get to commit treason to prove their loyalty to Thor. As clichéd as it is, the scenes are genuinely quite lovely.

Sadly, the biggest problem with the movie are the Dark Elves, who feel much like the Chitauri from The Avengers, acting simply as Mjolnir-fodder for most of the movie, there is no background to them whatsoever. There is no reason given for their plans of domination of the universe, leaving it to our imaginations that they’re doing it because they’re evil. Their faceless presence throughout the movie doesn’t give any sense of dread or evil, simply being there.

Despite these flaws, the movie still manages to stand up to its predecessor. The tone is different this time around, being different from the fish-out-of-water comedy that was the original, this time being a more dramatic, action packed outing, but it’s great viewing nonetheless.

Also, a fun little cameo from Chris O’Dowd in the beginning of the film as Jane’s awkward date makes wonderful viewing.

In Short: At least it’s not Iron Man 3

Kanye West - Yeezus
Rating: 9/10
Tracklisting:
1. On Sight (Feat. Daft Punk)
2. Black Skinhead (Feat. Daft Punk)
3. I Am A God (Feat. God)
4. New Slaves (Feat. Frank Ocean)
5. Hold My Liquor (Feat. Justin Vernon & Chief Keef)
6. I'm In It (Feat. Assassin & Justin Vernon)
7. Blood On The Leaves
8. Guilt Trip (Feat. Kid Cudi)
9. Send It Up (Feat. King L & Gesaffelstein)
10. Bound 2 (Feat. Charlie Wilson)
Released: June 18 2013 (Roc-A-Fella Records, Def Jam Records)
Kanye West has always been a man who wasn’t comfortable releasing “easy” albums, always creating something that challenged the listener, that defied the conventions of music at the time, bringing a breath of fresh air for rap and hip-hop each time. However, for Yeezus, his sixth studio album, collaborations and compilations notwithstanding, it doesn’t take the form of a breath of fresh air as much as it forcibly grabs the listener’s ears and shoves them down a wind tunnel. Once again, he has redefined his sound, this time opting for an all-out, abrasive, angry sound, influenced by everything from Chicago acid house, to industrial rock, to more recent avant-garde hip hop, popularised by acts such as Death Grips or Tyler The Creator. Yeezus also features some downright surprising collaborators and producers, ranging from techno’s man of the moment Gesaffelstein, to up & coming Chicago rapper King L, to demigods of electronic music Daft Punk. The result is an album that feels almost unlistenable in places upon the first listen, but given the chance, this presents itself as some of West’s strongest work to date.
The album kicks off with the distorted 303 acid roller On Sight. The track, provided by Parisian kings of electro Daft Punk, sets the stage for the whole album, clocking in at under 3 minutes, it’s short, but definitely not sweet. However, it manages to be just a strong as the rest of the album, despite being somewhat jarring, especially when an inexplicable choir sample interrupts halfway through. If this was any other artist, I would have thought that my CD was broken, but this is a Kanye West album, and I’ve learned to expect the unexpected, and that it’s all there for a reason. Listening back, the choir is revealed to be singing ”He’ll give us what we need, It may not be what we want”. Is West saying that he knows that his latest effort with disappoint some, but they need to hear it regardless? It certainly seems possible, and it wouldn’t be surprising, given how he pulled a similar trick with his 4th album, 808s & Heartbreak.
The second track on the album Black Skinhead is a loud, punk/rap hybrid, described as “super primal and raw and super violent” by Daft Punk, who recorded much of the instruments with West in their Paris studio, alongside their recording of their latest album Random Access Memories. Black Skinhead is the polar opposite of RAM, featuring heavy drum breaks, and deep, dark synths, serving as the album’s most radio friendly track, which isn’t saying much at all. Even the title is a poke at white supremacists, who are often described as “skinheads”, and how West is often painted as a racist, whereas he always asserts that the black population in America, along with the other minorities, are beginning to stand up for their rights. The lyrics speak of the media’s distortion of reality and racism, with West referencing Hitler “trapped in a theatre”. Anyone with even a vague notion of world history will be aware that Hitler died in his bunker beneath Berlin, but in the Quentin Tarantino movie “Inglourious Basterds”, Hitler is trapped and killed in a theatre. West also makes a reference to “black kids in Chiraq”, a slang term used among Chicago’s youth in referral to the city’s high murder rate, illuminating that this fails to garner any attention from America’s principal news outlets. Like the rest of the album, this album is millions of miles away from the old-school soul samples of The College Dropout or the stadium rock influenced Graduation, feeling bombastic and energetic, but in a completely new way.
Blood On The Leaves is definitely one of the more familiar songs on the album, taking the vulnerability and auto-tune of 808s & Heartbreak, and combines it with the grandiose and intricate production of his latest work on My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, as well as Cruel Summer, the compilation album from West’s G.O.O.D Music cadre. The track opens by sampling “Strange Fruit” by Nina Simone. Readers may be wondering about West has managed to flip a song about American racism, into a song about unwanted children, and how they are used as a means to an end, or are even just viewed as a burden on the parents, but in this context, the sample feels appropriate. Gone are the days when West’s samples are simply facsimiles of the song they’re used in, such as Never Let Me Down, or Stronger. Now they have become separate voices, adding another layer of depth to the song, where the children, who are ignored in terms of narrative, which is left to the arguing parents, are given a voice, being represented through the “black bodies” described by Simone. West also samples “R U Ready”, a seminal trap track from TNGHT, a collaboration project between Canadian producer Lunice and Scottish DJ Hudson Mohawke, the latter of whom also produces I am a God. The concept of “Strange Fruit” mixing with a trap track is initially baffling, but after listening, it’s difficult to imagine this floorfiller any other way.
The album closes with the track Bound 2, a track that stutters along, sounding that a throwback, to West’s soulful origins on The College Dropout, constructed mostly from a chopped sample of “Bound” by Ponderosa Twins Plus One, whilst Charlie Wilson drops a hook over an interpolation of Aeroplane (Reprise) by Wee. Whilst this song carries on the tradition of West using soul samples in his music, this is clearly a song from Yeezus, with West’s rapping being harsher and more vulgar than his critically acclaimed debut. Lyrically, the song speaks of West’s status in society, referring to his position as music’s prime troublemaker, as well as making references to college and college life, a hark back to his first 3 albums, which all followed the theme of education. The last lines on the album read “Jerome’s in the house, watch your mouth!”, a joke about Martin Lawrence’s 1990’s TV character, a parody of “ghetto black people”, this could be a hint that West is aware of his behaviour and lyrical content on Yeezus, perhaps stating that Yeezus is in fact a persona, not only his “God name”, as West told friends and fans as his NYC listening party.
If West’s last solo effort was grand and opulent, an elegant party with fine wine and caviar, then Yeezus is a warehouse rave at 3am with copious amounts of illegal substances. The smooth samples and intricate melodies have all been replaced with an eclectic collection of harsh instruments and a cacophony of acid house, industrial rock and hip hop, leaving behind a brash, unforgiving but ultimately rewarding hybrid that feels perfectly natural for West.

Also check out:
The Bloody Beetroots - Hide
Pusha T - My Name Is My Name
Death Grips - No Love Deep Webb

Kanye West - Yeezus

Rating: 9/10

Tracklisting:

1. On Sight (Feat. Daft Punk)

2. Black Skinhead (Feat. Daft Punk)

3. I Am A God (Feat. God)

4. New Slaves (Feat. Frank Ocean)

5. Hold My Liquor (Feat. Justin Vernon & Chief Keef)

6. I'm In It (Feat. Assassin & Justin Vernon)

7. Blood On The Leaves

8. Guilt Trip (Feat. Kid Cudi)

9. Send It Up (Feat. King L & Gesaffelstein)

10. Bound 2 (Feat. Charlie Wilson)

Released: June 18 2013 (Roc-A-Fella Records, Def Jam Records)

Kanye West has always been a man who wasn’t comfortable releasing “easy” albums, always creating something that challenged the listener, that defied the conventions of music at the time, bringing a breath of fresh air for rap and hip-hop each time. However, for Yeezus, his sixth studio album, collaborations and compilations notwithstanding, it doesn’t take the form of a breath of fresh air as much as it forcibly grabs the listener’s ears and shoves them down a wind tunnel. Once again, he has redefined his sound, this time opting for an all-out, abrasive, angry sound, influenced by everything from Chicago acid house, to industrial rock, to more recent avant-garde hip hop, popularised by acts such as Death Grips or Tyler The Creator. Yeezus also features some downright surprising collaborators and producers, ranging from techno’s man of the moment Gesaffelstein, to up & coming Chicago rapper King L, to demigods of electronic music Daft Punk. The result is an album that feels almost unlistenable in places upon the first listen, but given the chance, this presents itself as some of West’s strongest work to date.

The album kicks off with the distorted 303 acid roller On Sight. The track, provided by Parisian kings of electro Daft Punk, sets the stage for the whole album, clocking in at under 3 minutes, it’s short, but definitely not sweet. However, it manages to be just a strong as the rest of the album, despite being somewhat jarring, especially when an inexplicable choir sample interrupts halfway through. If this was any other artist, I would have thought that my CD was broken, but this is a Kanye West album, and I’ve learned to expect the unexpected, and that it’s all there for a reason. Listening back, the choir is revealed to be singing He’ll give us what we need, It may not be what we want”. Is West saying that he knows that his latest effort with disappoint some, but they need to hear it regardless? It certainly seems possible, and it wouldn’t be surprising, given how he pulled a similar trick with his 4th album, 808s & Heartbreak.

The second track on the album Black Skinhead is a loud, punk/rap hybrid, described as “super primal and raw and super violent” by Daft Punk, who recorded much of the instruments with West in their Paris studio, alongside their recording of their latest album Random Access Memories. Black Skinhead is the polar opposite of RAM, featuring heavy drum breaks, and deep, dark synths, serving as the album’s most radio friendly track, which isn’t saying much at all. Even the title is a poke at white supremacists, who are often described as “skinheads”, and how West is often painted as a racist, whereas he always asserts that the black population in America, along with the other minorities, are beginning to stand up for their rights. The lyrics speak of the media’s distortion of reality and racism, with West referencing Hitler “trapped in a theatre”. Anyone with even a vague notion of world history will be aware that Hitler died in his bunker beneath Berlin, but in the Quentin Tarantino movie “Inglourious Basterds”, Hitler is trapped and killed in a theatre. West also makes a reference to “black kids in Chiraq”, a slang term used among Chicago’s youth in referral to the city’s high murder rate, illuminating that this fails to garner any attention from America’s principal news outlets. Like the rest of the album, this album is millions of miles away from the old-school soul samples of The College Dropout or the stadium rock influenced Graduation, feeling bombastic and energetic, but in a completely new way.

Blood On The Leaves is definitely one of the more familiar songs on the album, taking the vulnerability and auto-tune of 808s & Heartbreak, and combines it with the grandiose and intricate production of his latest work on My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, as well as Cruel Summer, the compilation album from West’s G.O.O.D Music cadre. The track opens by sampling “Strange Fruit” by Nina Simone. Readers may be wondering about West has managed to flip a song about American racism, into a song about unwanted children, and how they are used as a means to an end, or are even just viewed as a burden on the parents, but in this context, the sample feels appropriate. Gone are the days when West’s samples are simply facsimiles of the song they’re used in, such as Never Let Me Down, or Stronger. Now they have become separate voices, adding another layer of depth to the song, where the children, who are ignored in terms of narrative, which is left to the arguing parents, are given a voice, being represented through the “black bodies” described by Simone. West also samples “R U Ready”, a seminal trap track from TNGHT, a collaboration project between Canadian producer Lunice and Scottish DJ Hudson Mohawke, the latter of whom also produces I am a God. The concept of “Strange Fruit” mixing with a trap track is initially baffling, but after listening, it’s difficult to imagine this floorfiller any other way.

The album closes with the track Bound 2, a track that stutters along, sounding that a throwback, to West’s soulful origins on The College Dropout, constructed mostly from a chopped sample of “Bound” by Ponderosa Twins Plus One, whilst Charlie Wilson drops a hook over an interpolation of Aeroplane (Reprise) by Wee. Whilst this song carries on the tradition of West using soul samples in his music, this is clearly a song from Yeezus, with West’s rapping being harsher and more vulgar than his critically acclaimed debut. Lyrically, the song speaks of West’s status in society, referring to his position as music’s prime troublemaker, as well as making references to college and college life, a hark back to his first 3 albums, which all followed the theme of education. The last lines on the album read “Jerome’s in the house, watch your mouth!”, a joke about Martin Lawrence’s 1990’s TV character, a parody of “ghetto black people”, this could be a hint that West is aware of his behaviour and lyrical content on Yeezus, perhaps stating that Yeezus is in fact a persona, not only his “God name”, as West told friends and fans as his NYC listening party.

If West’s last solo effort was grand and opulent, an elegant party with fine wine and caviar, then Yeezus is a warehouse rave at 3am with copious amounts of illegal substances. The smooth samples and intricate melodies have all been replaced with an eclectic collection of harsh instruments and a cacophony of acid house, industrial rock and hip hop, leaving behind a brash, unforgiving but ultimately rewarding hybrid that feels perfectly natural for West.

Also check out:

The Bloody Beetroots - Hide

Pusha T - My Name Is My Name

Death Grips - No Love Deep Webb

The Bloody Beetroots - Hide
Rating: 9/10
Tracklisting:
1. Spank (Feat. Tai & Bart B More)
2. Raw (Feat. Tommy Lee)
3. Runaway (Feat. Greta Svabo Bech)
4. Chronicles Of A Fallen Love (Feat. Greta Svabo Bech)
5. The Furious (Feat. Penny Rimbaud)
6. Out Of Sight (Feat. Paul McCartney & Youth)
7. Albion With Junior
8. Reactivated
9. All The Girls (Around The World) (Feat. Theophilus London)
10. Please Baby (Feat. P-Thugg)
11. Glow In The Dark (Feat. Sam Sparro)
12. The Source (Chaos & Confusion)
13. The Beat (Feat. Peter Frampton)
14. Rocksteady (The Bloody Beetroots Vs. Gigi Barocco)
15. Volevo Un Gatto Nero (You Promised Me) (Feat. Gigi Barocco)
Released:16 September 2013 (Ultra Records)
I’m sure many of you are familiar with Daft Punk's latest album, Random Access Memories, where the Parisian electro pioneers turned back the clock and released an album full of summer anthems, laden with the guitar work of Nile Rodgers and Paul Jackson Jr. (whose work can be found all over Micheal Jackson’s Thriller). This new LP from “Sir Bob Cornelius Rifo”, serves as the anti-thesis to RAM, which chooses to manhandle your eardrums and shove them down a wind-tunnel instead of serenade them with smooth disco grooves.
The album kicks off with Spank, a collaboration with Tai & Bart B More, which was released in February 2013. Out of all of the tracks that make up the new album, this one sounds closest to Rifo’s first album Romborama. It is loud, obnoxious electro at its best, the typical Dim Mak sound, but it throws a curveball towards the latter half of the song, with a short piano interlude, followed by a string accompaniment, building back up to the chorus, displaying Rifo’s training as a classical musician, and really giving the track some depth, distancing it from the branding of “EDM”.
The second track on the album is Raw, featuring the talents of Mötley Crüe founder and drummer Tommy Lee. This track really shows off Rifo’s heavier influences, which didn’t really shine through on Romborama, but showed up on Rifoki, Bob’s hardcore punk project with Dim Mak head honcho Steve Aoki. The track certainly lives up to it’s namesake, overflowing with crash symbols, distorted guitars and unusual time signatures. The track even takes time to gently tease the re-emergence of disco, featuring a dramatic change in style, where the track segues into a disco breakdown, featuring Tommy exclaiming “Woah Bob what the fuck is this? fucking disco music? you can’t be serious this is fucking bullshit, what’s next Bob? some cheesy little fucking leap synth?” and of course, Rifo obliges with just that. If this had been on any other album this sort of change of pace would have felt out of place and clunky, but on this album, it feels right at home.
Out of Sight, the album’s 6th track is definitely the biggest surprise, featuring Paul McCartney, as well as Paul’s fellow Fireman Martin Glover, using his Youth persona. Those more familiar with McCartney having written Hey Jude, might be wondering what the hell he’s doing working with Rifo, but this track dispels any confusion, these two working together is as good as Kanye West & Justin Vernon, or Kid Cudi & Crookers. 
My personal favourite from the album is, unfortunately, also one of the shortest. Clocking in at only 2 minutes and 53 seconds, is Please Baby, a collaboration with Patrick “P-Thugg" Gamayel, of Chromeo fame. This track is, in the simplest terms possible, like a hyped up Chromeo track, it shows off Patrick’s typical talkbox madness and synth-playing, but rather than accompanying Dave1’s smooth vocals, it’s at the forefront of the music, backed up by Bob’s shuddering electro.
Rocksteady is another suprising track on the album, because it’s not Rocksteady. “What the fuck is he talking about?” I hear you ask. Well this version of Rocksteady, is not the song that was released back in 2012, but is in fact a re-edited version of the Gigi Barocco remix, who shows up on the album’s closing track, a ear-shattering trash metal / electro hybrid that destroys any idea that this album wasn’t incredible. Presumably, Bob thought that Gigi's remix was even better than the original, and turned it into the final album edit, the extended opening and altered drop make this re-edit one of the strongest tracks on the album.
The album’s closing track, a proper collaboration with Gigi Barocco, Volevo Un Gatto Nero (You Promised Me), is quite frankly, insanity. Starting off with a children’s choir, the song suddenly becomes something not unlike what would happen if Kill Em All-era Metallica decided that they really needed Skrillex to spice up their new album. And i’ll fight anyone who says that this song doesn’t impress them, because Bob has certainly saved the best until last.
The rest of the album features appearances from, electro’s first lady, Greta Svabo Bech, as well as man of the moment Theophilus London, and talkbox pioneer Peter Frampton, who all bring their own flair to the album, but ultimately, this album works best if listened to as a whole, much like Justice's †or The Prodigy's Fat Of The Land.
This is definitely one of my album’s of the year, a huge recommendation, if you hadn’t guessed that already.
Stream:
Rolling Stone
Also check out:
Kanye West - Yeezus (just the whole album, it’s as eclectic as this one)
Justice - Waters Of Nazareth
Rage Against The Machine - Rage Against The Machine

The Bloody Beetroots - Hide

Rating: 9/10

Tracklisting:

1. Spank (Feat. Tai & Bart B More)

2. Raw (Feat. Tommy Lee)

3. Runaway (Feat. Greta Svabo Bech)

4. Chronicles Of A Fallen Love (Feat. Greta Svabo Bech)

5. The Furious (Feat. Penny Rimbaud)

6. Out Of Sight (Feat. Paul McCartney & Youth)

7. Albion With Junior

8. Reactivated

9. All The Girls (Around The World) (Feat. Theophilus London)

10. Please Baby (Feat. P-Thugg)

11. Glow In The Dark (Feat. Sam Sparro)

12. The Source (Chaos & Confusion)

13. The Beat (Feat. Peter Frampton)

14. Rocksteady (The Bloody Beetroots Vs. Gigi Barocco)

15. Volevo Un Gatto Nero (You Promised Me) (Feat. Gigi Barocco)

Released:16 September 2013 (Ultra Records)

I’m sure many of you are familiar with Daft Punk's latest album, Random Access Memories, where the Parisian electro pioneers turned back the clock and released an album full of summer anthems, laden with the guitar work of Nile Rodgers and Paul Jackson Jr. (whose work can be found all over Micheal Jackson’s Thriller). This new LP from “Sir Bob Cornelius Rifo”, serves as the anti-thesis to RAM, which chooses to manhandle your eardrums and shove them down a wind-tunnel instead of serenade them with smooth disco grooves.

The album kicks off with Spank, a collaboration with Tai & Bart B More, which was released in February 2013. Out of all of the tracks that make up the new album, this one sounds closest to Rifo’s first album Romborama. It is loud, obnoxious electro at its best, the typical Dim Mak sound, but it throws a curveball towards the latter half of the song, with a short piano interlude, followed by a string accompaniment, building back up to the chorus, displaying Rifo’s training as a classical musician, and really giving the track some depth, distancing it from the branding of “EDM”.

The second track on the album is Raw, featuring the talents of Mötley Crüe founder and drummer Tommy Lee. This track really shows off Rifo’s heavier influences, which didn’t really shine through on Romborama, but showed up on Rifoki, Bob’s hardcore punk project with Dim Mak head honcho Steve Aoki. The track certainly lives up to it’s namesake, overflowing with crash symbols, distorted guitars and unusual time signatures. The track even takes time to gently tease the re-emergence of disco, featuring a dramatic change in style, where the track segues into a disco breakdown, featuring Tommy exclaiming “Woah Bob what the fuck is this? fucking disco music? you can’t be serious this is fucking bullshit, what’s next Bob? some cheesy little fucking leap synth?” and of course, Rifo obliges with just that. If this had been on any other album this sort of change of pace would have felt out of place and clunky, but on this album, it feels right at home.

Out of Sight, the album’s 6th track is definitely the biggest surprise, featuring Paul McCartney, as well as Paul’s fellow Fireman Martin Glover, using his Youth persona. Those more familiar with McCartney having written Hey Jude, might be wondering what the hell he’s doing working with Rifo, but this track dispels any confusion, these two working together is as good as Kanye West & Justin Vernon, or Kid Cudi & Crookers

My personal favourite from the album is, unfortunately, also one of the shortest. Clocking in at only 2 minutes and 53 seconds, is Please Baby, a collaboration with Patrick “P-Thugg" Gamayel, of Chromeo fame. This track is, in the simplest terms possible, like a hyped up Chromeo track, it shows off Patrick’s typical talkbox madness and synth-playing, but rather than accompanying Dave1’s smooth vocals, it’s at the forefront of the music, backed up by Bob’s shuddering electro.

Rocksteady is another suprising track on the album, because it’s not Rocksteady. “What the fuck is he talking about?” I hear you ask. Well this version of Rocksteady, is not the song that was released back in 2012, but is in fact a re-edited version of the Gigi Barocco remix, who shows up on the album’s closing track, a ear-shattering trash metal / electro hybrid that destroys any idea that this album wasn’t incredible. Presumably, Bob thought that Gigi's remix was even better than the original, and turned it into the final album edit, the extended opening and altered drop make this re-edit one of the strongest tracks on the album.

The album’s closing track, a proper collaboration with Gigi BaroccoVolevo Un Gatto Nero (You Promised Me), is quite frankly, insanity. Starting off with a children’s choir, the song suddenly becomes something not unlike what would happen if Kill Em All-era Metallica decided that they really needed Skrillex to spice up their new album. And i’ll fight anyone who says that this song doesn’t impress them, because Bob has certainly saved the best until last.

The rest of the album features appearances from, electro’s first lady, Greta Svabo Bech, as well as man of the moment Theophilus London, and talkbox pioneer Peter Frampton, who all bring their own flair to the album, but ultimately, this album works best if listened to as a whole, much like Justice's or The Prodigy's Fat Of The Land.

This is definitely one of my album’s of the year, a huge recommendation, if you hadn’t guessed that already.

Stream:

Rolling Stone

Also check out:

Kanye West - Yeezus (just the whole album, it’s as eclectic as this one)

Justice - Waters Of Nazareth

Rage Against The Machine - Rage Against The Machine

All Hazards - California Soul
Rating: 4/5
Tracklisting:
1. California Soul
2. Party Down
3. Blame It All On You
4. Blur
5. Summer Fog
Released: 14 October 2011 (Independently released)

I love this EP.
Clever disco samples but with synths that both Dillon Francis & Justice would be proud, this EP carries on the great work started off by Daft Punk with the release of Discovery (and is probably going to be continued with the upcoming new album.
The EP kicks off with title track California Soul, which sounds like All Hazards' answer to Crescendolls, even using the same breakdown technique just past the halfway mark. Based around a vocal loop, this song is a perfect summer anthem and feels like a breath of fresh air after listening to the likes of Skrillex & Crookers.
More disco sampling on the next track, Party Down. This song sounds like it was ripped straight from a Duck Sauce EP, which is by no means a bad thing. This song is very simple, with most of the song coming from the disco samples, however there is some more of the Dillon Francis style synths at work here.
Track number 3, Blame It All On You, is quite a slow burner, starting out sounding like a precursor to Madeon's Finale. But after a while that 2007 era Justice synth gets to work, and it kills the track. Suddenly the slow walking beat track gets a high energy work out and becomes something much better.
Blur is the 4th track on the album, following the precedent set by the previous song. A walking beat track, but here the synths take greater priority, with a chaotic drop transforming it into a disco/electro/club banger
The EP ends with Summer Fog, where for the first time, the song doesn’t begin with a sample, instead beginning with a simple synth melody, which is layered with some catchy piano chords, this continues until the drop. At this point, the Justice synths make their triumphant return to make their mark on this track. Coupled with some Bon Jovi guitar cuts, this song shows that the American duo can make songs that don’t revolve around samples. The second drop on this track is a highlight, where everything is jacked up to 11, kicking the synths and guitars into overdrive, perfect for a hectic club environment. A perfect way to round of an EP.
(Though not strictly part of the EP, something also worth checking out on All Hazards’ soundcloud are their collection of remixes. From Daft Punk to the Smashing Pumpkins, every genre is covered and they’re as good, if not better than, this EP. The signature synths return in many places and all are worth a listen but particularly their remixes of Boys Noize, Phoenix, La Roux & Fake Blood.)
Download:
Soundcloud
Also check out:
Oliver - MYB
Duck Sauce - Grand Steppin’
Daft Punk - Crescendolls
Remixes:
Summer Fog (Signs’ Torture Edit)

All Hazards - California Soul

Rating: 4/5

Tracklisting:

1. California Soul

2. Party Down

3. Blame It All On You

4. Blur

5. Summer Fog

Released: 14 October 2011 (Independently released)

I love this EP.

Clever disco samples but with synths that both Dillon Francis & Justice would be proud, this EP carries on the great work started off by Daft Punk with the release of Discovery (and is probably going to be continued with the upcoming new album.

The EP kicks off with title track California Soul, which sounds like All Hazards' answer to Crescendolls, even using the same breakdown technique just past the halfway mark. Based around a vocal loop, this song is a perfect summer anthem and feels like a breath of fresh air after listening to the likes of Skrillex & Crookers.

More disco sampling on the next track, Party Down. This song sounds like it was ripped straight from a Duck Sauce EP, which is by no means a bad thing. This song is very simple, with most of the song coming from the disco samples, however there is some more of the Dillon Francis style synths at work here.

Track number 3, Blame It All On You, is quite a slow burner, starting out sounding like a precursor to Madeon's Finale. But after a while that 2007 era Justice synth gets to work, and it kills the track. Suddenly the slow walking beat track gets a high energy work out and becomes something much better.

Blur is the 4th track on the album, following the precedent set by the previous song. A walking beat track, but here the synths take greater priority, with a chaotic drop transforming it into a disco/electro/club banger

The EP ends with Summer Fog, where for the first time, the song doesn’t begin with a sample, instead beginning with a simple synth melody, which is layered with some catchy piano chords, this continues until the drop. At this point, the Justice synths make their triumphant return to make their mark on this track. Coupled with some Bon Jovi guitar cuts, this song shows that the American duo can make songs that don’t revolve around samples. The second drop on this track is a highlight, where everything is jacked up to 11, kicking the synths and guitars into overdrive, perfect for a hectic club environment. A perfect way to round of an EP.

(Though not strictly part of the EP, something also worth checking out on All Hazards’ soundcloud are their collection of remixes. From Daft Punk to the Smashing Pumpkins, every genre is covered and they’re as good, if not better than, this EP. The signature synths return in many places and all are worth a listen but particularly their remixes of Boys Noize, Phoenix, La Roux & Fake Blood.)

Download:

Soundcloud

Also check out:

Oliver - MYB

Duck Sauce - Grand Steppin’

Daft Punk - Crescendolls

Remixes:

Summer Fog (Signs’ Torture Edit)

Major Lazer - Lazer Strikes Back Vol. 1
Rating: 3/5
Tracklist:
1. Jah No Partial (Jack Beats Remix)
2. Get Free (Yellow Claw Get Free Money Remix)
3. Original Don (DGRC Remix)
4. Hot Chip - Look At Where We Are (Major Lazer Remix)
Released: February 22 2013 (Mad Decent)
Released by Major Lazer to tide over impatient fans after having the “Free The Universe” release date pushed back, this ep contains 3 remixes of existing Major Lazer tracks as well as a remix of Hot Chip's Look At Where We Are Now. Another 2 EPs like this are expected to follow in the run-up to Free The Universe's release
The first remix from the EP is Jah No Partial, remixed by Scottish/British production crew Jack Beats. This is a really simple electro-house edit of the original, electing to simply alter the BPM and fine tune the track to fit into a house DJ’s set. Nonetheless i’ve been looking for this sort of remix of Jah No Partial since I heard it so this remix is a godsend.
The next remix, from Yellow Claw, is quite eclectic, at times sounding like a drum and bass track, sounding like a trap remix the next, then ending off sounding like a twisted hardstyle track. This isn’t my favourite remix of Get Free i’ve heard but it’s by no means the worst one either
Original Don is up next, with a pretty calm remix by DGRC. This remix is far too calm to feel at home in a club, but it can be properly appreciated at home or on an iPod. It emphasises the original track’s vocal loop, but that’s mostly the only thing that remains of the original, with the rest being lost in order to create this remix.
The final track on the EP is a remix of Hot Chip's Look At Where We Are Now. Different from the original but not too different, this remix treads the line well and manages to come out with a good trap style remix.  Definitely a highlight of the EP if you're enjoying this new genre (and not just the Harlem Shake)
Download the EP for free here
Also check out:
Major Lazer - Guns Don’t Kill People…Lazers Do

Major Lazer - Lazer Strikes Back Vol. 1

Rating: 3/5

Tracklist:

1. Jah No Partial (Jack Beats Remix)

2. Get Free (Yellow Claw Get Free Money Remix)

3. Original Don (DGRC Remix)

4. Hot Chip - Look At Where We Are (Major Lazer Remix)

Released: February 22 2013 (Mad Decent)

Released by Major Lazer to tide over impatient fans after having the “Free The Universe” release date pushed back, this ep contains 3 remixes of existing Major Lazer tracks as well as a remix of Hot Chip's Look At Where We Are Now. Another 2 EPs like this are expected to follow in the run-up to Free The Universe's release

The first remix from the EP is Jah No Partial, remixed by Scottish/British production crew Jack Beats. This is a really simple electro-house edit of the original, electing to simply alter the BPM and fine tune the track to fit into a house DJ’s set. Nonetheless i’ve been looking for this sort of remix of Jah No Partial since I heard it so this remix is a godsend.

The next remix, from Yellow Claw, is quite eclectic, at times sounding like a drum and bass track, sounding like a trap remix the next, then ending off sounding like a twisted hardstyle track. This isn’t my favourite remix of Get Free i’ve heard but it’s by no means the worst one either

Original Don is up next, with a pretty calm remix by DGRC. This remix is far too calm to feel at home in a club, but it can be properly appreciated at home or on an iPod. It emphasises the original track’s vocal loop, but that’s mostly the only thing that remains of the original, with the rest being lost in order to create this remix.

The final track on the EP is a remix of Hot Chip's Look At Where We Are Now. Different from the original but not too different, this remix treads the line well and manages to come out with a good trap style remix.  Definitely a highlight of the EP if you're enjoying this new genre (and not just the Harlem Shake)

Download the EP for free here

Also check out:

Major Lazer - Guns Don’t Kill People…Lazers Do

Dog Blood - Next Order/Middle Finger
Rating: 4/5
Tracklisting:
1. Next Order
2. Middle Finger
Released: 12 August 2012 (Boys Noize Records/OWSLA)
As always i’m late with this, but seeing as I started this blog today I think that’s allowed.
Boys Noize & Skrillex. You wouldn’t be blamed for thinking that they wouldn’t be that interested in working with each other. But you thought wrong.
And it’s a very good thing that you were wrong. Because this is VERY good stuff.
The first track, Next Order, is exactly what you’d hope for from Ridha & Moore. It sounds like Boys Noize, but dancier, which is where Skrillex comes in. The melody is unmistakably Boys Noize, but Skrillex’s influence has instantly been felt, feeling more upbeat as a result. Skrillex’s signature vocal editing is in full effect here, combining with that synth to create a techno-infused club banger that all kinds of electro fans can love.
The other track, Middle Finger, is in a similar vein to the first, with the vocal editing back again, but this time it’s warping a loop of 2Pac to create a great build up, dropping into a funky beat where you can hear Skrillex’s synths in all their glory. A good alternative to Next Order and leaves you wanting more material, which is apparently coming soon.
Purchase:
Beatport
Also check out:
Boys Noize - Let’s Buy Happiness
Gesaffelstein - Depravity
Destructo - Technology 
Remixes:
Middle Finger (The M Machine Remix)

Dog Blood - Next Order/Middle Finger

Rating: 4/5

Tracklisting:

1. Next Order

2. Middle Finger

Released: 12 August 2012 (Boys Noize Records/OWSLA)

As always i’m late with this, but seeing as I started this blog today I think that’s allowed.

Boys Noize & Skrillex. You wouldn’t be blamed for thinking that they wouldn’t be that interested in working with each other. But you thought wrong.

And it’s a very good thing that you were wrong. Because this is VERY good stuff.

The first track, Next Order, is exactly what you’d hope for from Ridha & Moore. It sounds like Boys Noize, but dancier, which is where Skrillex comes in. The melody is unmistakably Boys Noize, but Skrillex’s influence has instantly been felt, feeling more upbeat as a result. Skrillex’s signature vocal editing is in full effect here, combining with that synth to create a techno-infused club banger that all kinds of electro fans can love.

The other track, Middle Finger, is in a similar vein to the first, with the vocal editing back again, but this time it’s warping a loop of 2Pac to create a great build up, dropping into a funky beat where you can hear Skrillex’s synths in all their glory. A good alternative to Next Order and leaves you wanting more material, which is apparently coming soon.

Purchase:

Beatport

Also check out:

Boys Noize - Let’s Buy Happiness

Gesaffelstein - Depravity

Destructo - Technology 

Remixes:

Middle Finger (The M Machine Remix)

Digitalism & Tommy Trash - Falling
Rating: 4/5
Released: 23 July 2012 (Spinnin’ Records)
There is no point reviewing this song really, but I really really like it and I feel that everyone should hear it.
The idea of a Digitalism/Tommy Trash collaboration is a very very odd one, and yet, surprisingly, it works.And even better, it works well. You can hear the individual styles of both Digitalism & Tommy Trash at work on this track, but they never clash, only serving to compliment one another.
The highlight of this track has to be the breakdown in the middle, where the song goes from loud, technical club powerhouse to happy carefree summer anthem, before building up back into it’s original melody.
It’s a great track, and one that should be appearing many DJ sets, come summertime
Also check out:
Steve Aoki - Ladi Dadi (Tommy Trash Remix)
Digitalism - Blitz

Digitalism & Tommy Trash - Falling

Rating: 4/5

Released: 23 July 2012 (Spinnin’ Records)

There is no point reviewing this song really, but I really really like it and I feel that everyone should hear it.

The idea of a Digitalism/Tommy Trash collaboration is a very very odd one, and yet, surprisingly, it works.
And even better, it works well. You can hear the individual styles of both Digitalism & Tommy Trash at work on this track, but they never clash, only serving to compliment one another.

The highlight of this track has to be the breakdown in the middle, where the song goes from loud, technical club powerhouse to happy carefree summer anthem, before building up back into it’s original melody.

It’s a great track, and one that should be appearing many DJ sets, come summertime

Also check out:

Steve Aoki - Ladi Dadi (Tommy Trash Remix)

Digitalism - Blitz

Bastille - Pompeii Remixes EP
Rating: 4/5
Tracklist:
1. Pompeii
2. Poet
3. Pompeii (Tyde Remix)
4. Pompeii (Monsieur Adi Remix)
5. Pompeii (Kat Krazy Remix)
Released: 22 February 2013 (Virgin Records)
Yes it’s finally here (i’m a little late with this but what are you going to do I made this blog 2 hours ago), and i’m very impressed with this EP.
Pompeii, Bastille’s newest hit, is currently engaged with Justin Timberlake in a struggle for chart supremacy, and it’s not hard to see why. Vocalist Dan Smith’s singing is pitch perfect in this track, and the mix between the synths (sounding not unlike those from Micheal Calfan’s Resurrection) and the drums sounding like they’ve been ripped straight from Kanye West’s Love Lockdown. The supporting vocals (provided by To Kill A King) give this track a very dramatic, and yet upbeat feel, guaranteeing the song’s commmerical success.
Poet, a previously unreleased track, is the other original track on this EP, the rest of the EP being made up of various Pompeii remixes. Another display of Bastille’s careful use of synths to accentuate their mostly acoustic instruments, this song feels like it would be at home in an indie movie as the backing to some sort of summer montage. An excellent addition to your music library.
The first of the Pompeii remixes comes from Tyde, a simple 135BPM remix of no particular merit (in my opinion). It fails to capture the feel of the original track like the other two tracks so it just fails to impress me very much.
The next remix comes from Monsieur Adi. Thisremix is a simple electro house edit but the synths used on this make it feel like more of an alternative take on Pompeii, if Bastille had decided to make a house infused track. Very good remix.
The final Pompeii remix comes from Kat Krazy, who has made a remix similar to that of Monsieur Adi, but a little more electro, giving this remix a sound that is reminiscent of Feed Me & Crystal Fighters’ Love Is All We Got.
This EP is an excellent offering from Bastille, showing the flexibility of their music and that it can even be turned from alternative indie to loud electro club bangers. Great value for money.
Purchase:
iTunes
Also check out:
Feed Me & Crystal Fighters - Love Is All We Got
Calvin Harris & Florence Welch - Sweet Nothing

Bastille - Pompeii Remixes EP

Rating: 4/5

Tracklist:

1. Pompeii

2. Poet

3. Pompeii (Tyde Remix)

4. Pompeii (Monsieur Adi Remix)

5. Pompeii (Kat Krazy Remix)

Released: 22 February 2013 (Virgin Records)

Yes it’s finally here (i’m a little late with this but what are you going to do I made this blog 2 hours ago), and i’m very impressed with this EP.

Pompeii, Bastille’s newest hit, is currently engaged with Justin Timberlake in a struggle for chart supremacy, and it’s not hard to see why. Vocalist Dan Smith’s singing is pitch perfect in this track, and the mix between the synths (sounding not unlike those from Micheal Calfan’s Resurrection) and the drums sounding like they’ve been ripped straight from Kanye West’s Love Lockdown. The supporting vocals (provided by To Kill A King) give this track a very dramatic, and yet upbeat feel, guaranteeing the song’s commmerical success.

Poet, a previously unreleased track, is the other original track on this EP, the rest of the EP being made up of various Pompeii remixes. Another display of Bastille’s careful use of synths to accentuate their mostly acoustic instruments, this song feels like it would be at home in an indie movie as the backing to some sort of summer montage. An excellent addition to your music library.

The first of the Pompeii remixes comes from Tyde, a simple 135BPM remix of no particular merit (in my opinion). It fails to capture the feel of the original track like the other two tracks so it just fails to impress me very much.

The next remix comes from Monsieur Adi. Thisremix is a simple electro house edit but the synths used on this make it feel like more of an alternative take on Pompeii, if Bastille had decided to make a house infused track. Very good remix.

The final Pompeii remix comes from Kat Krazy, who has made a remix similar to that of Monsieur Adi, but a little more electro, giving this remix a sound that is reminiscent of Feed Me & Crystal Fighters’ Love Is All We Got.

This EP is an excellent offering from Bastille, showing the flexibility of their music and that it can even be turned from alternative indie to loud electro club bangers. Great value for money.

Purchase:

iTunes

Also check out:

Feed Me & Crystal Fighters - Love Is All We Got

Calvin Harris & Florence Welch - Sweet Nothing

Strip Steve - Delta Disco
Rating: 4/5
Tracklist:
1. Breakin’
2. AM/FM
3. Dancin’
4. Children
5. Point Break
Released: 22 November 2009 (Boys Noize Records)

Yes i’m aware that this was released about 3 years ago, but a lot of people aren’t aware of who Strip Steve is, and that simply won’t do
The EP kicks off with my personal favourite, Breakin’.The entire EP sounds like a lovechild between Boys Noize and some 90’s house music, and that sounds is really prevalent in this track, right down to the cut up disco-esque melody and the looped vocals, to the Robot Rock style breakdown at the midway mark. This is a skillfully composed track that should take pride of place in any DJ’s setlist
Next up is AM/FM, a nice progressive house track, and not quite as chaotic as Breakin’. This song revolves around the bassline, which is augmented with various other layers as the track goes on, peaking in a relaxed funky disco track. Also that bassline near the end is to die for.
The EP’s third track, Dancin’, is a classic house banger. Based on a 2 second long vocal sample from a 1981 funk track, this track makes excellent of those drum beats that you only get with house music.But of course, just releasing a 90s house track might be a bit boring, so Steve brings in some of his funk synths to beef up the track a little bit, resulting in a brilliant track sure to get any club “jumping” (ugh I hate saying that), unless it’s populated by kids who listen to Swedish House Mafia
Disco is the main theme on Children, looping the phrase “feels good” at the beginning, just in case you weren’t sure on how to feel before now, and building up into another disco-house track. It’s a good thing that Steve does these styles well or I might have gotten writing the words “disco house” a few songs ago. But yeah, a funky track that feels like it could have been ripped straight from 1997.
The EP ends with Point Break, a departure from the fast paced house of the first 4 tracks, instead going for a relaxed (of sorts) track. Not my favourite track on the EP, a little too boring. Sorry Steve.
Aside from the somewhat weak ending, this EP is an excellent purchase and well worth the money (or torrenting, whatever you do)
Purchase Links:
Beatport / iTunes
Also check out:
Strip Steve - Delta Disco Remixes EP
Boston Bun - Housecall EP
Riton - Lost My Mind
Remixes:
Breakin’ (Rynecologist Remix)
Dancin’ (Ian Pooley Remix)

Strip Steve - Delta Disco

Rating: 4/5

Tracklist:

1. Breakin’

2. AM/FM

3. Dancin’

4. Children

5. Point Break

Released: 22 November 2009 (Boys Noize Records)

Yes i’m aware that this was released about 3 years ago, but a lot of people aren’t aware of who Strip Steve is, and that simply won’t do

The EP kicks off with my personal favourite, Breakin’.
The entire EP sounds like a lovechild between Boys Noize and some 90’s house music, and that sounds is really prevalent in this track, right down to the cut up disco-esque melody and the looped vocals, to the Robot Rock style breakdown at the midway mark. This is a skillfully composed track that should take pride of place in any DJ’s setlist

Next up is AM/FM, a nice progressive house track, and not quite as chaotic as Breakin’. This song revolves around the bassline, which is augmented with various other layers as the track goes on, peaking in a relaxed funky disco track. Also that bassline near the end is to die for.

The EP’s third track, Dancin’, is a classic house banger. Based on a 2 second long vocal sample from a 1981 funk track, this track makes excellent of those drum beats that you only get with house music.
But of course, just releasing a 90s house track might be a bit boring, so Steve brings in some of his funk synths to beef up the track a little bit, resulting in a brilliant track sure to get any club “jumping” (ugh I hate saying that), unless it’s populated by kids who listen to Swedish House Mafia

Disco is the main theme on Children, looping the phrase “feels good” at the beginning, just in case you weren’t sure on how to feel before now, and building up into another disco-house track. It’s a good thing that Steve does these styles well or I might have gotten writing the words “disco house” a few songs ago. But yeah, a funky track that feels like it could have been ripped straight from 1997.

The EP ends with Point Break, a departure from the fast paced house of the first 4 tracks, instead going for a relaxed (of sorts) track. Not my favourite track on the EP, a little too boring. Sorry Steve.

Aside from the somewhat weak ending, this EP is an excellent purchase and well worth the money (or torrenting, whatever you do)

Purchase Links:

Beatport / iTunes

Also check out:

Strip Steve - Delta Disco Remixes EP

Boston Bun - Housecall EP

Riton - Lost My Mind

Remixes:

Breakin’ (Rynecologist Remix)

Dancin’ (Ian Pooley Remix)

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A selection of things that i've bothered to give me opinion on

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